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What's the Matter with Helen?

What's the Matter with Helen?(1971)

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  • what's the matter with helen?

    • kevin sellers
    • 5/30/17

    The answer to the film title's question is : She's Overacting! (Not surprising, considering who's playing her)

  • Awesome is winsome

    • Will Fox
    • 5/23/17

    The towering tramp, Timothy Carey, 6 ft. 4, is a menacing character, who shocks Debbie Reynolds, expecting her dream date, Dennis Weaver, wealthy father of a Shirley Temple wannabee, enrolled in Debbie's dance school, located in Hollywood. Tim Carey resembles Bruce Dern, often as eccentric characters, propelling plot-lines. Both play pivotal personalities, preferred by Hollywood's most iconic film directors, Alfred Hitchcock & Stanley Kubrick. Two of Carey's most significant parts, previewing plot developments came in Stanley Kubrick's early films: In 1956 "The Killing" he is the man who shoots a race horse, foreshadowing a robbery drama. In the iconic 1957 anti-war film, "Paths of Glory," Carey is the WW1 soldier, a scapegoat, unfairly singled out for execution by an imperialistic, French General, demonstrating unquestionable tyranny. Carey, cast for imposing presence, assaulted Marlon Brando & James Dean, plus bullies Debbie Reynolds, begging for money as a 1930s Great Depression bum in "What's the Matter with Helen?" Not since 1952 "Singing in the Rain" has Debbie soared so much as an exuberant, dancing star. Here, 20 years on in a sequel to "Singing," she sizzles. Beyond her "cute, young girl in a chorus line," Debbie does a delightful tease in her extended, sensuous tango. "Helen" is also an engaging sequel to "What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?" 1962 gave birth to the genre of Drama Queens Starring in Horror. Debbie & aging star, Shelly Winters are winsome, as awesome women re-inventing themselves. It's the main plot line in "Helen," as well as the new reality for these highly accomplished actresses. Decades of experience, they really know how to please audiences. Especially Debbie delights.

  • Nothing is the matter with Helen.

    • Chris Hayes
    • 4/23/15

    Truly a gem. (And I'm not easy to please.) Debbie Reynolds and Dennis Weaver are star-crossed lovers whose romance is threatened by Shelley Winters--the original frenemy. Also, this is also sort of a musical. (Try not to notice that when Reynolds and Winters are engaged in a mini-fight, they conveniently lift their arms to avoid knocking over a lamp.)

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