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War and Peace

War and Peace(1968)

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War and Peace Epic adaptation of... MORE > $39.99
Regularly $39.99
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  • Narrator  

    On 12th June, 1812, the forces of western Europe crossed the frontiers of Russia and war began. In other words, an event took place that was contrary to all human reason and human nature.

  • Prince Andrei Bolkonsky  

    Natasha... I love you too much. More than anything in the world.

  • Natasha Rostova  

    And I! But why too much?

  • Prince Andrei Bolkonsky  

    Why too much? Well, what do you think? What do you feel in your soul, deep in your soul? Shall I live? What do you think?

  • Natasha Rostova  

    I'm sure of it.

  • Prince Andrei Bolkonsky  

    How good that would be.

  • Narrator  

    And not for this day and hour alone were the mind and conscience of this man darkened, on whom the burden of events weighed more heavily than on all the others who took part in it. Never, to the end of his life, had he the least comprehension of goodness, of beauty or of truth, or of the significance of his actions, which were too contrary to goodness and truth, too remote from everything human for him ever to understand their meaning. He could not disavow his deeds, lauded as they were by half the world, and so he was obliged to renounce truth and goodness and all humanity.

  • Narrator  

    Enough, enough, men. Stop, consider, what are you doing? Into the minds of tired and hungry men on both sides, a flicker of doubt began to creep. Were they to go on slaughtering one another? Kill whom you like, do what you like, but I've had enough. Yet some inexplicable, mysterious power continued to control them, and the terrible business went on, carried out not by the will of individual men.

  • Narrator  

    A moral victory which compels the enemy to recognize the moral superiority of his opponent and his own impotence was won by the Russians at Borodino. The direct consequence of the Battle of Borodino was Napoleon's flight from Moscow, the destruction of the invading army of 500,000 men, and the destruction of Napoleonic France, on which was laid for the first time, at Borodino, the hand of an adversary stronger in spirit!

  • Narrator  

    I want only to say that it is always the simplest idas which lead to the greatest consequences. My idea, in its entirety, is that if vile people unite and constitute a force, then decent people are obliged to do likewise; just that.