skip navigation
Susan Lenox (Her Fall and Rise)

Susan Lenox (Her Fall and Rise)(1931)

Contribute

FOR Susan Lenox (Her Fall and Rise) (1931) YOU CAN

UPLOAD AN IMAGE SUBMIT A VIDEO OR MOVIE CLIP ADD ADDITIONAL INFORMATION WRITE YOUR OWN REVIEW

TCM Messageboards
Post your comments here
ADD YOUR COMMENT>

share:
Remind Me

TCMDb Archive MaterialsView all archives (1)

Shop tcm.com

Susan Lenox (Her... - NOT AVAILABLE

Crying Boy

VOTE FOR THIS TITLE:
Our records indicate this title is not available on Home Video. Vote below for it to be released on DVD.

  1. Total votes: vote now!
  2. Rank: (why vote?)

NOTES

powered by AFI

The working titles of this film were Suzanne Lenox and Susan Lenox. Some modern sources erroneously refer to the film as Susan Lenox, Her Rise and Fall. According to contemporary news items and production charts, King Vidor was initially set to direct the picture, and actresses Lynn Bernager and Marjorie King were to have roles in the film. Vidor was replaced by Robert Z. Leonard, and the appearance of either Beranger or King in the completed film has not been confirmed. A Hollywood Reporter news item noted that "extended retakes and revisions" of the film were made in mid-August 1931 after the film had been previewed for the press. Another Hollywood Reporter news item noted that following his role in the film, actor Jean Hersholt, a Dane by birth, was appointed by the King of Denmark to head the American committee in charge of Denmark's participation in the 1932 Olympic Games. In a filmography in the biographical file for Edgar G. Ulmer at the AMPAS Library, he is listed as the director of German and French versions of this film; however, no contemporary information about any foreign-language versions of the film has been located. A modern source includes a brief epilogue in its description of the film in which the characters of "Rodney" and "Helga" are living happily in a mountain cabin near the construction site of Boulder Dam (which was later renamed Hoover Dam). This sequence was not in the viewed print nor was it in the cutting continuity.