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Trouble in Paradise

Trouble in Paradise(1932)

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Trouble in Paradise A love triangle ignites... MORE > $25.97 Regularly $39.95 Buy Now

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  • forgotten credit

    • Dancebander
    • 12/1/17

    Colete's clothes...2 words. Travis Banton! Donald Novis comes over from the Cocoanut Grove to sing the title song.

  • depression era relief found in 'Paradise'...

    • Colin
    • 12/23/16

    As a pre-code flick,'Trouble In Paradise'was founded upon the writing of Aladar Laszlo,Samson Raphaelson & Grover Jones.The some title was credited to W.Franke Harling & Leo Robin,& perhaps introduced in the beginning of the credits (including a bed),by contemporary crooner Donald Novis?As directed by the (already) then famed Ernest Lubitsch,it seems that he got everything he wanted from (Paramount),for HIS film.This included the cast of picked actors themselves,who included Miriam Hopkins (Lily-pick pocket,thief),Herbert Marshall (Gaston-master thief),Kay Francis-who had to be borrowed back fromWarner Brothers-(Mariette Colet),Edward Everett Horton (Francisco-chasing skirts & Mariette),Charlie Ruggles(the Major-chasing Mariette),C.Aubrey Smith (Adolph-Mariette's crooked banker),Robert Creig(the butler),Rolfe Sedan(salesman);& others.The silly plot found idle rich people basking in riches & boredom,with thieves Gaston & Lilly cooking up a master con job upon wealthy widow & perfume company owner,Mariette).Its all a lot of fun,with Kay Francis stealing the movie from Miriam Hopkins,(who had stolen a previous film from Kay-'24 Hours'.Amoung all the wit heard,perhaps Edward Everett Horton's 'business associates'line is the best?Was Herbert Marshall Cary Grant's acting inspiration?Or model?When first issued,this film made most of it's monies overseas,yet shortly became most appreciated as the best sophisticated comedy ever made,or at least one of the earliest.Why hate rick people when you can laught at them?

  • Delicious Cinema Souffle-Perfezione!

    • paulette33
    • 11/19/14

    Lubitsch's film school was via German silent films. Trouble in Paradise's opening scene is curious. It's silent except for the sound of a slender boat slipping through moonlit waters. What's that? Mounds of garbage & trash? The boat slides along several trash stations interrupted by the garbage collector-boatman singing the Neapolitan tune "O Sole O Mio!" Ah! This is Italy, Venice to be exact. Look closer. The beautiful City of Romance is surrounded by water&garbage! Their garbage men sing songs about sunshine whilst collecting trash at night! Camera pans to a magnificent hotel. There are shadows, screams & the thud of a body hitting the floor followed by a delicious melange of Italianish jibberish. Listen, there's a lovely musical refrain, almost a lullaby. We're introduced to dashing Gaston (Herbert Marshall) giving minute details to a waiter on what he expects during his evening with Lily (Miriam Hopkins). Their date is a comedic revelation. 2 charming scam artist thief pick-pockets pretending to be royalty pretending not to be scam artist thieving pick-pockets, but lying thieving and pick-pocketing as foreplay! It's one of the most beautiful funniest scenes ever filmed. But there are many most-beautiful-funniest-scenes-ever-filmed in Trouble in Paradise. It's almost sinful to have this much fun & perfection in one movie. There's a rhythm and musicality here-can't be explained you have to just let the movie draw you in (which it does in seconds). Kay Francis is gorgeous and funny as the lovely Madame Colet. C. Aubrey Smith is perfect as the long-time friend to Colet's dead husband's wealthy family. Nonpareil veteran comedians Charles Ruggles and Edward Everett Horton are a delight to watch as they fight over Madam Colet's affections. But Herbert Marshall is the shining star - what a gorgeous talented actor. Marshall deserves the adoration, recognition and acclaim given to Cary Grant. Watch it. Fall in love. Repeat.

  • Smooth As Satin

    • Lucky Lassie
    • 9/21/14

    A marvel of wit, pathos and style. Every glance and glide upon a staircase is exquisite.

  • THE VERY BEST!!!

    • FieryScott
    • 8/2/14

    This and "Stage Door" are the best two films I have ever seen. In both cases, tremendous acting, tremendous directing, tremendous casting, and flat-out tremendous everything. I could watch both of them every day.

  • trouble from parasites

    • Jeff Boston
    • 12/16/12

    Sly, sophisticated slimeball slithers his way into the world of a wealthy woman to steal from her safe and steals her heart in the process, to the chagrin of his charming charlatan chickadee. This 80-year-old film being bold keeps it from becoming old, and the steady degradation of our culture would have been accelerated had the long-term Hollywood production code not forbidden such filth a few years after its release.

  • Trouble in Paradise

    • Dashiell B.
    • 12/15/12

    The greatest definition of the term "Lubitsch touch." Two jewels thiefs meet in Venice & plot to rob a Parisian heiress. Marshall & Hopkins match each other scene-per-scene as the burgulars, and Francis is great as the lonely heiress. Brimming with sophisication, sexual politics and excellent dialouge, this is director Lubitsch at his absolute best. A charming, sophisicated romantic-comedy which lead the way for future screwball comedies. I give it a 5/5.

  • No code

    • Karla Herbold
    • 12/24/11

    This film was one of the last, great PRE- production code films. So it just slide sensuously around all those Production Code issues, but got "punished" a few years later by being denied re-release in the draconian Production Code years! A loss now rectified.

  • Trouble in Paradise (1932)

    • Mr. Blandings
    • 11/13/11

    Manically directed, like a living cartoon, this film certainly keeps you interested ... but I found Lubitsch just a bit too much Lubitsch in this one. Still, it has great performances by all the leads as well as by the secondary actors. Definitely pre-code in its "raciness."

  • Trouble in Paradise

    • Mark Sutch
    • 4/12/11

    *****

  • Good flick and an interesting Code-breaker

    • Jenny
    • 2/27/10

    This film is so entertaining and the characters so engrossing, that you don't realize that the film is running roughshod over the Production Code. Theft without punishment, living in sin, lying, stealing, adultery and then - the theives get away at the end! It's amazing that it passed. A testament to the talent of all involved, because the code is the last thing you think of when you watch this film.

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