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The Trip

The Trip(1967)

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The Trip A young man drops acid in... MORE > $8.15 Regularly $14.95 Buy Now

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  • the trip

    • kevin sellers
    • 5/21/16

    The previous reviewer, Monkeyboy, calling this humorless, dull film a "lighthearted, delightful masterpiece" makes me think the simian fellow's taken a bit too much acid. As an examination of the stoned out 60s "The Trip" is about half as good as "Easy Rider" and a third as good as "Blow Up." The fantasy sequences are like Fellini and Bergman if those two directors had been morons, while the character development is nil. All we know about the lead character, decently portrayed by Peter Fonda, is that he's a commercial TV director with marital problems. This is, however, considerably more than we know about his wife, played boringly as usual by Susan Strasberg, and his best friend, well played, with a nice undertone of smarminess, by Bruce Dern. Blame the pallid screenplay by Jack Nicholson for saddling the viewer with these uninvolving folks. (Sure am glad ol Jack chose to outsource the writing to Terry Southern on the better "Easy Rider.") The direction, by Roger Corman, is a cut above the screenplay. There is a fun scene with Fonda and a frazzled working girl in a launderette (indeed, the only time that Monkeyboy's absurd comments ring true), as well as a scene where Fonda breaks into a suburban home and innocently watches TV with a ten year old girl while her parents are asleep upstairs. Needless to say this one scene tells us more about the difference between the 1960s and now than any number of "trips." And while I sympathize with Corman re: AIP messing up his properly ambiguous ending with the moralistic, cracked mirror graphic over Peter Fonda on the morning after, does it really make a difference? I mean, it's not like we care all that much about the guy to begin with? Maybe because we don't feel we know him. Give it a C plus.

  • Fun fun fun!

    • Monkeyboy
    • 5/19/16

    A delightful, light hearted masterpiece!

  • So terribly bad

    • John Hare
    • 4/9/13

    I remember this back in 1967. What makes it even worse is that Dick Clark produced it!!

  • Quick, somebody get me a puke bag!

    • Thomas Dixon
    • 2/26/13

    This movie is so bad I won't even waste my time writing all the things I hate about it.

  • AHHHHHHHHHHH

    • ROBERT SHACKELFORD
    • 11/8/08

    This movie is a series of situations that look cool but turn it AHHHHHHHHHHHH.Poor Odeseus moves through the plot with no safe haven. Discontinuity. It is a noble attempt at something. A good try that just doesn't quiet project the creator's vision. Alas, it needed a good artist to reach a derivative of itself. And a good sound guy.

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