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Trade Winds

Trade Winds(1938)

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  • BENNETT -BLONDE OR BRUNETTE?

    • keith brown
    • 4/21/14

    A young woman is tracked halfway around the world by a relentless and amorous detective and his two helpers: a a leech- like secretary and a dimwitted police detective. While Joan Bennett, Frederic March Ann Sothern and Ralph Bellamy tackled the parts, director Tay Garnett had background plates made of his recent trip to the orient and some of the process shots work and some do not The dialogue is fast and funny with Sothern and Bellamy going for most of the laughs Frederic March was taking a break from all those costumers and although a detective his character is reminiscent of the stinker he played in NOTHING SACRED until love"redeems" However for me the real joy of the film is watching the turning point in Bennett's career going from beautiful blonde to scintillating brunette Was there an in joke about making her into a Hedy Lamarr look alike- since Bennett's husband produced ALGIERS which was a big hit for Lamarr (Although Bennett looks a bit like Ruth Hussey as well...) Whatever the reason Benntt's roles got much more interesting after this film especially the ones she did later with Fritz Lang, Max Opuls and Jean Renoir Good luck can come in "twos" since Ann Sothern's career as MAISIE would soon be starting

  • Ann Sothern.

    • Chris
    • 5/17/11

    Loved the movie, the ending was a bit contrived though. March and Bennett were great in their roles. But Sothern and Bellamy were wonderful. They would have made a perfect comedy team.

  • at last!

    • AL
    • 5/2/11

    For starters: Dorothy Parker

  • Trade Winds

    • MARLENA
    • 5/1/11

    I am so excited you are showing this film. It's one of my favorites.I have it set to record so I can watch it over and over.Thanks for showing it.

  • I REMEMBER THIS ONE!

    • laurel koch
    • 11/26/09

    I saw this TRADE WINDS at least 40 years ago on TV. Ann Sothern plays the supporting female role. In the scene that stuck with me, her hair is done in an up-sweep with one of those little powder-puff hats at the front of her head - ya gotta love it! She plops herself up on a barstool in total disgust, slaps the bar top and says, "Hit me!" to whoever is behind the bar. Just one of those visuals that warms my heart.

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