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Tomorrow, the World!

Tomorrow, the World!(1944)

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NOTES

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News items in Hollywood Reporter yield the following information about this production: Producer Lester Cowan bought the rights to James Gow and Arnaud D'Usseau's stage play for $75,000 plus 25% of the gross, not to exceed a total of $350,000. Cowan initially considered Elliott Nugent and Leo McCarey to direct the film, and playwright Victor Wilson was first hired to write the screenplay. The contributions of Wilson to the completed film, if any, have not been confirmed. In May and June 1944, Cowan wanted to cast "Quiz Kid" Ruth Duskin as "Pat" and tested Scotty Beckett and Claude Binyon for the role of "Emil." Skippy Homeier, who was finally cast as "Emil," also played the role on Broadway. This marked Homeier's screen debut. Edit Angold also appeared as "Frieda" in the Broadway production. Although July 1944 news items add Voyt Williams, Frances Norris, Ruth Warren, Fred Chapman and Ralph Hoops to the cast, their participation in the released film has not been confirmed.
       In August 1944, Cowan announced he was changing the title of the film to The Intruder, initiating protests from Gow and D'Usseau. Cowan decided to retain the original title Tomorrow the World after a group of exhibitors voted in favor of that title. The picture was awarded the first "Writer's Award" by the Hollywood Writer's Mobilization, a group of radio and screenwriters who contributed their part-time services to the OWI. The honor was awarded "in recognition of [the film's] superior merit as dramatic entertainment, blended with timely and significant idea content, representative of the best in current thought." Certain screenings of the film were followed by "town meetings" featuring a general audience discussion of the issues.