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Tombstone: The Town Too Tough to Die

Tombstone: The Town Too Tough to Die(1942)

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NOTES

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The working titles of this film were The Bad Men of Arizona and Tombstone. The 1939 book Tombstone, the Toughest Town in Arizona, May have been a reissue of Walter Noble Burns original book Tombstone: An Iliad of the Southwest, which was first published in New York in 1927. Hollywood Reporter news items variously reported Dean Franklin or Dean Reisner as the author of the original story, but neither Franklin nor Reisner's name appears in any other source, and any contribution of either man to the final film has not been confirmed. Kent Taylor's character name is misspelled "Doc Halliday" in the onscreen credits.
       Hollywood Reporter news items reported the following information about the production: Due to a dispute over characterizations, director Lesley Selander was replaced by William McGann. Preston Foster and Ellen Drew were considered for lead roles in this film, and Philip Terry was replaced by Don Castle. Some scenes were shot on location in Tucson, AZ and Long Valley, CA. According to information in Paramount publicity records, technical advisor Frederick Gildart was a personal friend of Wyatt Earp, and acted as an advisor for Richard Dix on his portrayal of the renowned sheriff. Modern sources add Beryl Wallace, Charles Stevens, Jack Rockwell, Hal Taliaferro and Charles Middleton to the cast. There have been many filmed versions of the 1881 gunfight at the O.K. Corral. For additional information on the gunfight, and the Earp and Clanton families, see My Darling Clementine (above).