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The Time Machine

The Time Machine(1960)

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The opening title card reads "H. G. Wells' The Time Machine." Voice-over narration throughout the film, by Rod Taylor, as Wells, explains the character "George's" experience traveling through time. A May 26, 1955 Hollywood Reporter news item notes that producer George Pal hired David Duncan to write a screenplay adaptation of Wells's novel The Time Machine. On June 3, 1958, Hollywood Reporter reported that Pal was approached by Shiro Kido of Nippon's Shochiko Productions to co-produce an adaptation of the novel, but Kido's participation in the released film, which is not mentioned in reviews or in the onscreen credits, is unlikely.
       Despite Film Daily Year Book listing the company's name as Galaxy Pictures, Inc., the film's onscreen credits read "Galaxy Films, Inc." Although Wells's original depiction of the year 802,701 is portrayed in the film, the novel does have several additional journeys into the future, including a stop at a beach where "George" is attacked by giant crabs and several million years into the future where the only sign of life is a black amorphous life form with tentacles. A modern source adds Josephine Powell to the cast.
       The film won a Best Special Effects Academy Award in 1960. A 1979 film entitled Time After Time, was inspired by Wells's novel and featured Malcolm McDowell as an author, who travels through time in his own invention. The film was directed by Nicholas Meyer and co-starred Mary Steenbergen. In 2002, Simon Wells, H. G. Wells's great-grandson, directed Guy Pearce and Mark Addy in The Time Machine, a DreamWorks and Warner Bros. adaptation of the novel.