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The Threat

The Threat(1949)

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The Threat An escaped con kidnaps the... MORE > $15.95 Regularly $17.99 Buy Now

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  • the threat

    • kevin sellers
    • 11/25/18

    Very good psycho turn by Charles McGraw. Not Mitchum or Bogie or Ryan, but close. Unfortunately, he's the only interesting character in the film (Virginia Gray's disloyal gangster's moll and Don McGuire's everyman/schlemiel trucker perhaps excepted) and so when this utter scumbag is finally gunned down (appropriately by Gray), rather than cheer you're kinda sorry. Surely that's not what the film makers intended. Was it? Give it a B minus for McGraw.

  • Interesting Movie Mistake

    • Karen Gonzales
    • 11/13/18

    We just saw the Threat and it was fascinatingly brutal for it's time. Charles McGraw was at his best! We did spot a glaring mistake in the movie that I am surprised got by the editors. The DA in the movie was named Barker MacDonald. About 10 minutes into the film, when the DA is kidnapped, the newspaper headline reads "Barker Kidnapped. The close-up on the story below repeats the mistake of reversing the character's name as MacDonald Barker. Every other reference in the movie to the character is correct.

  • Celebrate Charles McGraw

    • Will Fox
    • 11/12/18

    TCM's ideal film-host, Eddie Muller for Film Noir Ally rewards classics collectors with consistently clear insights in word pictures. Think Mr. McGraw in The Threat. Eddie's enlightenment enhances, educates, enthusiastically enticing extra engagement. Muller's street-savvy book, Dark City: The Lost World of Film Noir celebrates Charles McGraw as an actor, "an armored car, draped in a pin-striped suit." McGraw's "broad, blocky presence lent any scene additional heft. As villains, not many players were as physically threatening. As heroes, few conveyed juggernaut determination so off-handedly, or believably." [Visualize 1940s and 1950s' heroic, comics cop, Dick Tracey's squared-jawed detective, deducing clues, doggedly pointing at crimes with his protruding chin, conducting crooks' comeuppances.] "McGraw was simply a natural on-screen. By the early 60's his bluntness had acquired a nicely weathered quality, used to good advantage by [A-List directors'] Stanley Kubrick's Spartacus [1960], Anthony Mann's Cimarron [1961], and Alfred Hitchcock's The Birds [1963]." Giving credit where credit is overdue, thankfully TCM has been featuring Charles McGraw for more than 10 years, as the hard-boiled cop in one of the finest, film noirs, 1952's The Narrow Margin. Both it and 1949's The Threat are two of film noirs fastest features, each clocking in at less than 70 minutes of unexpectedly original twists and exciting climaxes. For suspenseful intrigues, cop-capturing-cunning-crooks, see Charles McGraw in The Threat, The Narrow Margin, etc. on TCM.

  • Hell Hath No Fury...

    • H.A.C.
    • 11/11/18

    For all of Kluger's man-handling methodology, Carol's lethal come back was like God closing up the Red Sea against the Egyptians.

  • Film Noir Good

    • notbad
    • 11/11/18

    Michael O'Shea,a hometown hero to us in CT,shines,McGraw at his noir best/vicious.Good cast,a deserved fav.

  • Great find

    • lynnej
    • 7/3/15

    This movie is a great rainy day movie where one could see the noir genre in it's prime. The only thing is that when the wife realized that the husband was in trouble by the name "Dexter" why didn't the police understand that the crooks were most likely listening?Other than that, as I stated a great find. I'll watch this again when it comes on like I do Casablanca, They Drive By Night and The Big Sleep.

  • the threat--near lost but worth seeking out.

    • gary posner
    • 10/1/07

    underrated, very rare taut little thriller/noir.terrific performance by noir icon Charles mcgrew.

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