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This Earth Is Mine

This Earth Is Mine(1959)

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Crying Boy

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NOTES

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The film ends with the following written statement: "We gratefully acknowledge the cooperation of the following California vineyards and estates in the filming of this motion picture: Inglenook, Paul Masson, Italian Swiss Colony, Beaulieu, Christian Brothers, Sebastiani, Charles Krug, Louis M. Martin, Schramsberg, Beringer Bros., Stag's Leap Ranch, Mayacamas, Cella and Sucram Ranch." This Earth Is Mine was the first film made by Vintage Productions, an independent production company owned by Casey Robinson and Claude Heilman and named for this film. According to a November 23, 1958 New York Times article, Heilman raised $25,000 from the Wine Institute of California and the Wine Advisory Board in order to buy the screen rights to the story. On June 18, 1958, Hollywood Reporter announced that Universal would co-produce and distribute the film.
       Universal borrowed director Henry King and actor Ken Scott from Twentieth Century-Fox for this picture. According to a August 14, 1958 Hollywood Reporter news item, Fay Spain and Yvette Vickers tested for roles in the film. In a July 14, 1959 Hollywood Citizen-News article, King described his practice of visiting "the public and theater men" prior to production in order to test public interest in the film and to gain insight into "certain phases of casting." As noted in Hollywood Reporter news items, most scenes were shot on location in Napa Valley, including, according to the November 1958 New York Times piece, Inglenook Winery and Yountville, CA. This Earth Is Mine marked the feature film debut of Tammy Windsor. Although several contemporary sources assert that the film marked the debut of Cindy Robbins, and her opening credits reads "and introducing Cindy Robbins," she appeared in her first film in 1957.