skip navigation
That Touch of Mink

That Touch of Mink(1962)

TCM Messageboards
Post your comments here
ADD YOUR COMMENT>

share:
Remind Me

TCMDb Archive MaterialsView all archives (1)

Shop tcm.com

That Touch of... - NOT AVAILABLE

Crying Boy

VOTE FOR THIS TITLE:
Our records indicate this title is not available on Home Video. Vote below for it to be released on DVD.

  1. Total votes: vote now!
  2. Rank: (why vote?)

Articles

powered by AFI

SEE ALL ARTICLES
That Touch of Mink (1962)

SYNOPSIS

Cathy Timberlake, an out-of-work computer programmer, is on her way to collect her unemployment check when she is splashed with muddy water by a passing limousine carrying millionaire businessman Philip Shayne. Feeling bad about not stopping and helping her, Shayne spies her entering the Automat across the street and sends his financial adviser Roger down with money to compensate her. Cathy tells Roger she'd rather throw the money in Shayne's face, but when she meets him, his suave good looks and charm disarm her, and she's soon off on a whirlwind trip with him to Yankee Stadium, Philadelphia and other places. When Philip offers to take her with him on a pleasure trip to Bermuda, Cathy wrestles with her conscience and finally decides to go. But before the affair can be consummated, her nerves and guilt get the best of her and she breaks out in a rash. Back in New York, she decides to give it another shot, and upon arriving in Bermuda, she starts to drink heavily to overcome her jitters. By the time Philip arrives, she's intoxicated and ends up falling out of his window. After hatching a plan with Roger and her roommate Connie to make Philip jealous, she finally gets him to marry her, but on their honeymoon he breaks out in a rash.

Director: Delbert Mann
Producers: Robert Arthur, Martin Melcher, Stanley Shapiro
Screenplay: Stanley Shapiro, Nate Monaster
Cinematography: Russell Metty
Editing: Ted J. Kent
Art Direction: Robert Clatworthy, Alexander Golitzen
Original Music: George Duning
Cast: Cary Grant (Philip Shayne), Doris Day (Cathy Timberlake), Gig Young (Roger), Audrey Meadows (Connie), Alan Hewitt (Dr. Gruber), John Astin (Everett Beasley).
C-99m.

Why THAT TOUCH OF MINK is Essential

They look dated, silly, even prudish to us today, but back in the late 50s and early 60s, Doris Day starred in a series of comedies built around the question of "will she or won't she have sex with him?" that were the beginnings of a change in the depiction of adult relationships on screen. Granted, these were not revolutionary films, and truth be told, even then they weren't considered particularly racy or shocking. But one thing was new here: the frank acknowledgement that certain adults, particularly those lucky enough to live and dress well in swinging Manhattan, were having sex without benefit of marriage. And this was an occasion not for scandal or tragedy but for slightly risqu humor. Okay, maybe Doris never actually did the deed until a ring was on her finger, but she often came damn close.

It was on the basis of these movies that Day acquired the lasting image of the eternal virgin, holding out against all odds for marriage. Yet that image, like all legends, is not always quite accurate. Many film analysts, including some feminist theorists, have noted that Day's characters were often career women, successful and independent, whose self-determination (whether sexual or financial) posed a challenge to the more devious and undisciplined men with whom they shared a mutual and frequently exasperating attraction. And in her films with Rock Hudson, what stops her as she approaches the bed is not so much a highly principled moral code of her own but the realization that her intended partner has no moral code of any kind at all.

That Touch of Mink, however, probably comes closest to the image of Day as the perpetual virgin. In this one, she's unemployed and easily dazzled by a wealthy older man's attentions and lavish gifts, and when he asks her on a romantic weekend, she immediately thinks he's proposing. Even so, the fight here is not so much with the man as with herself. Doris clearly wants it in this picture, and tries her best to be "that kind of girl." But her id keeps getting bested by her superego until, of course, she can call herself "Mrs."

At 38, Doris was still playing ingnue roles which were more appropriate for younger actresses. And here, instead of Rock Hudson, she's paired with an actor 20 years her senior. Of course it helps that the actor is the epitome of the dashing, romantic leading man. Audiences didn't seem to mind the age issue; this was, after all, Cary Grant, and what 38-year-old virgin wouldn't fall? And they didn't mind that Doris's close-ups were shot through a hint of gauze, especially since she exhibited expert comic timing to match Grant's own legendary skill at urbane comedy. That Touch of Mink became a box office smash, garnered glowing reviews, and even managed to earn several nominations and awards. No, it's not one of the great films of the 20th century, but as an artifact of an era, a style and a social code, That Touch of Mink succeeds on its own terms.

by Rob Nixon

back to top
That Touch of Mink (1962)

Doris Day's screen image, typified in this picture, has been the subject of much lampooning, both affectionate and savage, with references ranging from a song in the musical Grease (1978) to a skit on the British comedy show French and Saunders ("It could be Rock, it could be Cary; I really don't care who I marry"). Her image, however, as the girl-next-door virgin who refuses to have sex until she's married is a bit at odds with the subtler realities of her screen roles, in which she's usually a working woman, often quite successful, and not entirely averse to sex. In fact, in 1980, two British feminists persuaded the National Film Theater to mount a retrospective season of her movies, arguing that many of them dealt with concerns that later became prominent issues in the women's movement.

Aspects of this story and some of the earlier Day-Hudson pairings were spoofed by Ewan McGregor and Renee Zellweger in the comedy Down with Love (2003), set in 1962, the year of this film's release.

That Touch of Mink also received a tribute of sorts in the gay-themed film Touch of Pink (2004), a comedy of culture clashes that featured Kyle MacLachlan as the spirit of Cary Grant, offering advice to a young gay man living in London. The young man's Muslim mother, who grew up watching and wanting to emulate the Doris Day movies of the late 50s and early 60s, is finally softened to his "alternative lifestyle" when he buys her a suit "just like the one Doris Day wore in That Touch of Mink."

Like many of the Doris Day comedies of this period, this picture used suggestions of homosexuality as a comic device. In this one, however, it is the most blatant; the psychiatrist treating Gig Young's character hears him incorrectly and thinks Young is confessing to an affair with another man. Ironically, Day's star in her earlier pictures, Rock Hudson, later revealed himself to be gay, while rumors of bisexuality followed Grant throughout his life.

Although the script called for an "Audrey Meadows type" for the role that eventually went to Meadows herself, the part of Connie can be seen as another in a long line of wisecracking, often man-hating best friends most enduringly associated with another redhead, Eve Arden. In melodramas, this redheaded, sharp-tongued friend was often played by Agnes Moorehead.

An anti-Iraq War Internet blog from 2004 used this movie as an analogy for the current political situation. The comparison had something to do with George W. Bush as a seductive Cary Grant and Doris Day as a reluctant France and ended bizarrely with a rape. A very odd and tenuous connection, but one that may show some of the lasting impact of the film in today's culture.

by Rob Nixon

SOURCES:
Evenings With Cary Grant: Recollections in His Own Words and by Those Who Knew Him Best by Nancy Nelson
Cary Grant: A Biography by Marc Eliot
Doris Day - Her Own Story by A.E. Hotchner
Final Gig: The Man Behind the Murder by George Eells

back to top
That Touch of Mink (1962)

That Touch of Mink was Cary Grant's 69th movie in a career that stretched back to 1932. Although he was in his late 50s when he filmed it, Grant was still suave, handsome and an expert farceur. But he must have sensed it was time for a change. He made one more picture in which he was the dashing leading man, Charade (1963), opposite Audrey Hepburn. After that, he appeared as a grizzled old beachcomber in Father Goose (1964), then as a British gentleman who plays Cupid for the young romantic leads in Walk Don't Run (1966), his last film before retiring from the screen.

Doris Day's string of box office hits continued though with somewhat diminishing returns over the next six years in ten more films. After With Six You Get Eggroll (1968), the actress retired from the big screen. Her hit TV sitcom, The Doris Day Show, ran from 1968 to 1973, changing formats and storylines almost every season. In recent years she has devoted herself to animal care and rights.

Doris Day's screen characters in this period had a tendency to share similarities in names. Her name in That Touch of Mink is Cathy Timberlake, and in her previous release, Lover Come Back (1961), it was Carol Templeton. Between 1960 and 1962 she played characters named Kate, Kit and Kitty, and her names in her two 1959 releases were Jan and Jane.

Gig Young was born Byron Barr, and started his career under that name but took the name Gig Young after the character he played in the Barbara Stanwyck film The Gay Sisters (1942). Young was often troubled by disappointments in his career and by alcoholism, which got him fired from both Mel Brooks' Blazing Saddles (1974) and as the voice of Charlie on the TV series Charlie's Angels. He was Oscar®-nominated three times for Best Supporting Actor and won on the last go-round for They Shoot Horses, Don't They? (1969). But further success eluded him, and plagued by depression, he committed suicide in 1978 after fatally shooting his wife. According to George Ells in his biography Final Gig: The Man Behind the Murder, Young liked his role in That Touch of Mink and turned in a hilarious portrait, despite his desire to play the kind of leading parts that made Cary Grant a star, rather than the supporting roles to which he was most often relegated.

Grant and Young had a private detail in common they both underwent LSD therapy in the early 60s when it was still a tool of the psychiatric profession and not yet widespread as a recreational drug.

Director Delbert Mann started his career in television drama and parlayed one of his early TV projects into a major film debut, his production of Marty (1955), which he had directed on the air two years earlier. It earned Mann (as well as the picture, lead actor Ernest Borgnine and screenwriter Paddy Chayevsky) an Academy Award and ushered in a new era of small, intimate "slice-of-life" dramas. Mann continued to do sterling work in TV dramas, directing the occasional feature film throughout the decade, most notably guiding David Niven and Wendy Hiller to Oscar®s in Separate Tables (1958). In the 1960s he did two Doris Day comedies, That Touch of Mink and Lover Come Back (1961), and other big budget productions before returning to more intimate dramas and television, where he worked almost exclusively for nearly 30 years, until his last project in 1994.

Cinematographer Russell Metty began his long and distinguished career in the mid-1930s, eventually working with such directors as John Huston, Stanley Kubrick and Orson Welles. Some of his most famous work was for director Douglas Sirk, for whom he created the rich and often surreal color cinematography for such lavish melodramas as Magnificent Obsession (1954), All That Heaven Allows (1955), Written on the Wind (1956) and Imitation of Life (1959). He won an Academy Award for his work on Kubrick's Spartacus (1960).

That Touch of Mink was John Astin's second screen appearance after his debut in West Side Story (1961). Despite his many screen appearances, he is probably best known as the bizarre family patriarch in the TV series The Addams Family. He was once married to actress Patty Duke; their two sons, Sean and Mackenzie Astin, are both actors.

Dick Sargent (billed here as Richard) makes a brief appearance in the role of a frustrated newlywed who commiserates with Grant at the Bermuda resort. He became most famous a decade later as the "second Darrin" in the hit TV show Bewitched. Coincidentally, the future star of that show, Elizabeth Montgomery, was at the time of this picture's release married to Gig Young.

John Fiedler, who plays the mousy honeymooner Mr. Smith in That Touch of Mink, had a long career as a character actor and, thanks to his distinctive voice, as a voiceover artist, providing the voice of Winnie the Pooh's friend Piglet many times between 1964 and 2005.

One scene in That Touch of Mink features real-life New York Yankee baseball players Mickey Mantle, Roger Maris and Yogi Berra. The previous season, Mantle and Maris competed to see who could beat Babe Ruth's home-run record. Maris was the one who broke the single-season record.

Famous Quotes from THAT TOUCH OF MINK

CATHY (Doris Day): You're a sneaky, crude, offensive man. Of course, that's just how I feel. I'm sure there are hundreds of girls in this city who admire those qualities.

ROGER (Gig Young): With your money, you can run down half the girls in New York and still be solvent.

CONNIE (Audrey Meadows): When a girl reaches my age and still isn't married, you either philosophize or get arrested.

CONNIE: She's gonna spend the rest of her life saying "I'm not that kind of girl." I'm only afraid that someday before she can finish saying it, she will be.

PHILIP (Cary Grant): You're the type of woman who brings out the worst in a man his conscience.

PHILIP: Try Bergdorf-Goodman. I hear they're showing a new line of sacrificial evening gowns.

CATHY: Do you like the way I walk?
PHILIP: Poetry in motion.
CATHY: I learned when I was a baby, been walking for years.

CATHY: I fell out of Mr. Shayne's suite. See that I'm returned!

PHILIP: Al's Motel. Sounds like a place where you bring your own light bulbs.

Compiled by Rob Nixon

SOURCES:
Evenings With Cary Grant: Recollections in His Own Words and by Those Who Knew Him Best by Nancy Nelson
Cary Grant: A Biography by Marc Eliot
Doris Day - Her Own Story by A.E. Hotchner
Final Gig: The Man Behind the Murder by George Eells

back to top
That Touch of Mink (1962)

The formula of a modern girl on her own in the big city wrestling over her attraction to a man despite her standards, moral and otherwise, had worked well for Doris Day in her two previous mega-hits with Rock Hudson, Pillow Talk (1959) and Lover Come Back (1961). So why not continue the successful formula?

Stanley Shapiro was one of the writers on Pillow Talk and writer/producer of Lover Come Back. The latter film was still a top box office hit when Shapiro put together his next project in the successful Doris Day formula. To help with the screenplay, he pulled in Nate Monaster, whose previous credits had been exclusively on TV, except for the Jerry Lewis film The Sad Sack (1957).

The major coup in putting together this project was getting Cary Grant to co-star with Day. Grant had been in pictures for 30 years at this point and remained one of Hollywood's biggest stars. As the man who set the standards for romantic leads, he was a natural choice for this sort of latter-day screwball sex farce. In fact, when That Touch of Mink was released, one reviewer noted that the only difference between this and the earlier Day comedies was that in those, Rock Hudson had played the Cary Grant part, while in this, "the Cary Grant part is played by Cary Grant. When it comes to playing Cary Grant, nobody can beat Cary Grant."

Grant was responsible for having Audrey Meadows signed. The brassy redhead with the nasal voice had made her mark in the mid 1950s as Jackie Gleason's long-suffering wife Alice on the legendary sitcom The Honeymooners. Grant was a big fan of that show, and years earlier, upon meeting Meadows by chance, expressed how much he wished he could just "walk through the door and be in that set with all of you." Meadows later wondered how he would look "in that broken-down terrible set, the way he dressed and the way he looked." A few years later, Meadows' agent read the script for That Touch of Mink, which called for "an Audrey Meadows type." The agent contacted Grant, who was already attached to the project, and Grant pushed for Meadows in the role.

An actor sometimes noted for his Cary Grant-like appeal at the beginning of his career in the early 1940s, Gig Young found himself relegated to supporting roles in the sixties, usually providing light comic relief in such films as Desk Set (1957) as well as two Doris Day vehicles, Teacher's Pet (1958) and The Tunnel of Love (1958). He was brought in to fill what was essentially the Tony Randall role in the Doris Day formula, that of the neurotic sidekick to the dashing male lead. Shapiro and Monaster gave the part a somewhat more antagonistic twist, however, making Young an academic who bitterly resented being lured by Grant into the corporate world, despite its financial rewards.

by Rob Nixon

SOURCES:
Evenings With Cary Grant: Recollections in His Own Words and by Those Who Knew Him Best by Nancy Nelson
Cary Grant: A Biography by Marc Eliot
Doris Day In Her Own Words by A.E. Hotchner
Final Gig: The Man Behind the Murder by George Eells

back to top
That Touch of Mink (1962)

At the time of That Touch of Mink, Doris Day was the biggest box office star in the business, but she conceded the top billing to Cary Grant, out of respect for his long and distinguished career.

Grant returned the favor by conceding to Day in the only conflict that arose between them during filming. Both Day and Grant preferred their right profile for close-ups. Since it was impossible to accommodate both of them, Grant gave in on what Day later described as "our awkward impasse."

Gracious as she was about the billing, Day's status did earn her a higher salary: $750,000 as opposed to Grant's $600,000. He did, however, receive a percentage, which considering the film's ultimate success, did very well by the actor.

In her 1976 autobiography Doris Day: Her Own Story, the star wrote: "Of all the people I performed with, I got to know Cary Grant least of all. He is a completely private person, totally reserved, and there is no way into him. Our relationship on A Touch of Mink was amicable but devoid of give-and-take...Not that he wasn't friendly and polite he certainly was. But distant. Very distant. But very professional - maybe the most professional, exacting actor I ever worked with. In the scenes we played, he concerned himself with every little detail: clothes, sets, production values, the works. Cary even got involved in helping to choose the kind of mink I was slated to wear in the film."

When Grant noticed an ad for a raincoat that he thought would be appropriate for Day to wear in the picture, he called the owner of the company who made it. After explaining who he was and what he wanted the coat for, he was given the brush-off by the manufacturer, Norman Zeiler, who later recalled that he didn't believe it was Cary Grant. "So I told him if he wanted to see our collection, he'd have to come up himself. And he did." The much-imitated Grant, who usually made all his own calls and answered his home phone himself, often had that problem. People just couldn't believe it was really Cary Grant they were talking to.

Grant involved himself in many details of the production. For a scene that took place in his character's library, he arrived to work with boxes of items from the library in his own house and placed them about the set. According to Day, this served not only to make the set more attractive but also made him feel more relaxed and at home, giving his performance "that peculiarly natural, suave quality that is the hallmark of his pictures."

That Touch of Mink was filmed on location in New York. Some sources claim it was also shot in Bermuda, but others state that the scenes of the Bermuda resort were actually shot at the Fairmont Miramar Hotel in Santa Monica.

Audrey Meadows' housekeeper, Pat Scofield, desperately wanted to meet Grant. She would sit in Meadows' dressing room waiting for an opportunity, asking the actress's make-up man and hairdresser to fix her up in case Grant came her way. One day Meadows told Grant about Scofield, and he asked to meet her. According to Meadows, the housekeeper handled herself very well during the encounter but nearly collapsed when he left the room.

Grant reportedly urged Gig Young to make more of his role as the humorously unstable, psychiatry-obsessed financial adviser. He was generous and casual with Young, who in turn treated his idol Grant with deference.

by Rob Nixon

SOURCES:
Evenings With Cary Grant: Recollections in His Own Words and by Those Who Knew Him Best by Nancy Nelson
Cary Grant: A Biography by Marc Eliot
Doris Day - Her Own Story by A.E. Hotchner
Final Gig: The Man Behind the Murder by George Eells

back to top
That Touch of Mink (1962)

AWARDS & HONORS

That Touch of Mink received Academy Award nominations for Best Art Direction-Set Decoration, Color; Best Sound; and Best Writing, Story and Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen.

It was also a Golden Globe winner for Best Motion Picture Comedy. Cary Grant was also nominated as Best Actor in a Musical or Comedy.

That Touch of Mink won four Golden Laurel Awards (from motion picture exhibitors) for Top Comedy, Top Female Comedy Performance, Top Male Comedy Performance and Top Male Supporting Performance (Gig Young).

The Writers Guild of America awarded Shapiro and Monaster's screenplay the award for Best Written American Comedy of the year.

THE CRITICS CORNER

That Touch of Mink began its run at Radio City Music Hall (generally reserved for the most prestige pictures) in June 1962 and was an immediate commercial smash, also garnering good reviews. It solidified Doris Day's standing as the number one box office star and gave Cary Grant his biggest hit in years.

Some sources say That Touch of Mink was the number two box office hit of the year, others rank it third, behind Spartacus (1960) and West Side Story (1961) and tied with Day's previous release Lover Come Back (1961), which had premiered in Los Angeles the year before but was in wide release in the first half of 1962.

"[T]he adroit Mr. Shapiro has written a lively, lilting script, this one with Nate Monaster, that has as much glittering verbal wit and almost as much comic business as Pillow Talk [1959] and Lover Come Back [1961]... And Mr. Mann has directed it with that briskly propulsive pace and that pin-point precision in timing sight gags that are the distinction of his bright new comic style. ... Especially nimble is the sub-plot they have worked out with the psychotic aide and his stiff-faced psychiatrist, which could be nasty, if it weren't so ingenuous and droll. Gig Young as the aide and Alan Hewitt as the psychiatrist have at their roles with such glee and such humorous affectation that they add a great deal to the whole."
Bosley Crowther, New York Times, June 15, 1962.

"The recipe is potent: Cary Grant and Doris Day in the old cat-and-mouse game. The gloss of That Touch of Mink however, doesn't obscure an essentially threadbare lining. In seeming to throw off a sparkle, credit performance and pace as the key virtues. The rest of it is commonplace. ... Although Grant gives his tycoon the advantage of long seasoning at this sort of gamey exercise, he's clearly shaded in the laugh-getting allotment. As written, Day's clowning has the better of it; and she, by the way, certifies herself an adept farceur with this outing. But not surprisingly, the featured bananas make the best comedic score."
Variety, 1962.

"Jaded sex comedy (or what passed for it in nudge-nudge 1962) enlivened by practised star performances and smart timing."
- Halliwell's Film & Video Guide.

"Some older movies stand the test of time, becoming true classics; others gain a bit of curiosity value as a window into the filmmaking of years past. Others... well, some movies just don't age very well, and I'm afraid that That Touch of Mink falls squarely into the "too dated" category. That Touch of Mink is a comedy whose humor relies heavily on the viewers sharing certain cultural assumptions that may have been current in 1962 but, fortunately, don't hold true now."
- Holly Ordway, DVD Talk

"..the story's farcical elements are too labored and Grant is unusually unresponsive to his co-star, Doris Day. Day, typically, does a wonderful job responding to Grant, but Grant, while his timing is adept in the comedy sequences, conveys no sense of attraction for Day, and it is one more factor that helps to emphasize the mechanical nature of the film's structure."
- Doug Pratt, www.DVDlaser.com

"Sex comedies from the 1960s tend not to age too well, and while that's true to an extent with That Touch of Mink, it does hold up better than many other similar films from the period. Part of the credit goes to the screenplay, which is structurally quite sound and which features dialogue that actually is witty on occasion and, even when not witty, is at least appropriate. Unfortunately, the main plot itself is bound to give pause to some modern viewers, who will object to a number of things, including the inherent materialism, the sexual "obligation" that Doris Day feels, the age difference between the leads, and the outdated sexual role-playing that permeates the film. However, when suave and charismatic Cary Grant is on hand, and when Day is operating -- as here -- at the top of her form, things are bound to be kept lively and entertaining, and the stars do not disappoint."
- Craig Butler, www.allmovieguide.com

by Rob Nixon

back to top
teaser That Touch of Mink (1962)

Even though she could no longer be considered an ingenue by the early '60s, Doris Day continued to make romantic comedies toward the end of her career that depicted her as a constant virgin, holding out for sex until after marriage. A perfect example of this formula, That Touch of Mink (1962), stars Day (she was thirty-eight years old at the time) as Cathy Timberlake, an unemployed computer operator whose dream job is to be a housewife. Her luck starts to change when a passing motorist runs over a street puddle and sprays Cathy as she waits on a street corner. The car belongs to Philip Shayne (Cary Grant), a wealthy businessman and confirmed bachelor. A typical "meet cute" beginning, Cathy and Philip are soon an item but Cathy's morals are put to the test when she must decide whether or not to accept Philip's invitation for a romantic trip to Bermuda. After much hesitation, she eventually accepts and Philip overwhelms her with lavish gifts of clothes and a mink coat. Then he charters a commercial airplane just for her. Once they arrive in Bermuda, however, their romance becomes a comedy of errors, leading to a break-up and then the inevitable reconciliation.

According to Doris Day, Cary Grant was not at all like his screen image. In Doris Day: Her Own Story by A.E. Hotchner, the actress stated, "Of all the people I performed with, I got to know Cary Grant least of all. He is a completely private person, totally reserved, and there is no way into him. Our relationship on That Touch of Mink was amicable but devoid of give-and-take....Not that he wasn't friendly and polite - he certainly was. But distant. Very distant." The only conflict that arose between the two leads during filming was that both Day and Grant preferred their right profile for close-ups. Since it's impossible to film them both from the right side, someone had to give in. Day recalls, "Our awkward impasse was quickly dispelled by Cary's graciously forgoing his preference."

Day also remembers Grant as being extremely professional, "maybe the most professional, exacting actor I ever worked with. In the scenes we played, he concerned himself with every little detail: clothes, sets, production values, the works. Cary even got involved in helping to choose the kind of mink I was slated to wear in the film." And when Grant noticed an ad for a raincoat that he thought would be appropriate for Day's character, he called the owner of the manufacturing company. After explaining who he was and what he wanted the coat for, he received a cold reply. The owner, Norman Zeiler remembers, " I didn't believe it was Cary Grant, so I told him if he wanted to see our collection, he'd have to come up himself. And he did."

In addition to the film's leads, That Touch of Mink also features some well-known supporting actors. Audrey Meadows of TV's The Honeymooners plays Cathy's roommate. Meadows first met Cary Grant while The Honeymooners was still in production. She was surprised to learn Grant was a fan of the show and he even commented to her, "I'd love to walk through the door and be in that set with all of you." Meadows however, couldn't see it happening. In Evenings With Cary Grant by Nancy Nelson she comments, "Now, can you imagine him in that broken-down terrible set, the way he dressed and the way he looked?"

In one of his more amusing supporting roles, Gig Young almost steals the film as Roger, Philip Shayne's financial advisor. Young was born Byron Barr but took the stage name Gig Young after the character he played in the 1942 Barbara Stanwyck film, The Gay Sisters. Young frequently played second leads, never quite making it to leading man status despite his good looks and talented acting abilities. According to George Ells in Final Gig: The Man Behind the Murder, Young was eager to accept the part in That Touch of Mink, but his character's deference to Grant's character was representative of the roles he played and why he never became a star himself. Ells stated, "Gig turned it into a hilarious portrait. Yet, while he was nearly as handsome and as deft a comedian and was most certainly a better dramatic actor, he lacked the superstar's charisma." Young later won an Academy Award for his role in They Shoot Horses, Don't They? (1969). Unfortunately, his life ended tragically in 1978; he committed suicide after fatally shooting his wife.

Additional trivia: Two other well-known TV actors also had minor roles in That Touch of Mink: John Astin of The Addams Family and Dick Sargent of Bewitched. Also look for cameo appearances by baseball stars Roger Maris, Mickey Mantle and Yogi Berra. That Touch of Mink went on to score three Academy Award nominations: Best Original Screenplay, Best Art Direction, and Best Sound.

Director: Delbert Mann
Producer: Martin Melcher, Stanley Shapiro
Screenplay: Stanley Shapiro, Nate Monaster
Cinematography: Russell Metty
Art Direction: Alexander Golitzen, Robert Clatworthy
Music: George Duning
Cast: Cary Grant (Philip Shayne), Doris Day (Cathy Timberlake), Gig Young (Roger), Audrey Meadows (Connie), Alan Hewitt (Dr. Gruber), John Astin (Beasley), Richard Sargent (Harry Clark), Roger Maris (Himself), Mickey Mantle (Himself), Yogi Berra (Himself).
C-99m. Letterboxed. Closed captioning.

By Deborah L. Johnson

back to top