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Sword of Lancelot

Sword of Lancelot(1963)

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  • A Very Human Depiction

    • Tom McPhail
    • 10/26/12

    I watched this film as a boy when it came out in 1963. I was captivated then,I am captivated now. It is well-paced, although every battle sceneit slightly too long. It is the will-they-or-won't-they that drives the film, that andGuinever's passion for Arthur's first knight. But its the surprise ending that makes the film enjoyable.

    • 8/16/12

  • Another overlooked classic.

    • TOM B
    • 8/15/12

    Released toward the end of Hollywood's decade's long love affair ancient and medieval themed films, Cornel Wilde's view of trouble in Camelot is still worth looking at, some 50 years after its release. The first of a three films directed and acted in by Wilde, all of which are worth viewing, this has always been my favorite of the three. Indeed, the film is somewhat famous for both the second film in which Brian Anhere, a fine British actor, plays King Arthur, as well as providing Monty Python's Holy Grail with a funny moment when the noble knights first view Camelot. Coming into theaters at the cusp of the new realism of the 1960's, the film also some very gory moments, to include a tournament where a knight has his helmet split down the middle, with his head still in it, and another knight having his right arm hacked off (a scene which was deleted when the film was first released to TV). Over and above the gore, the film looks beautiful in the bright colors of the color film stock of the day. Indeed the very colorful medieval coats of arms look especially nice. Of course there is the love affair between Lancelot and Guinevere, play by Wilde's then real life wife (Jean Wallace). I think they carry it off far better than in the God-awful musical version of Camelot, which came out a few years later, especially in a very daring (then) love scene with Wilde and Wallace embracing in the nude (implied by their bare shoulders). The several battle scenes, however, are the real strength of the film and are far better staged than most of these period films. All in all, see it before you see Camelot and decide for yourself which film is better depicts this famous doomed love story.

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