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The Strange Woman

The Strange Woman(1946)

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  • the strange woman

    • kevin sellers
    • 10/31/14

    The bad seed set in 1840s Bangor, Maine. It has some interesting elements. I mean, there's always some interesting elements in an Edgar G. Ulmer movie. Examples would include a pruriently sin obsessed preacher who kinkily dresses in buckskin to preach against lust, a searing study in weakness by Louis Hayward (Ulmer is good with weak men) and a vivid depiction of a morally debased community. (I guess not much has changed in Steven King's hometown.) The problem is Hedy Lamarr, or rather Hedy Lamarr's acting. I mean, comparing her to Vivien Leigh, as the previous reviewer does, is just kinda nuts. With her absurd Hungarian accent in a character supposed to be a native of Maine (I mean, Vivien Leigh at least spoke Southern, not British, for cryin out loud) and her cheesy histrionics in place of actual evil, it's a faux performance from beginning to end. The child actress who plays her in the first five minutes of the movie is better. And, as Lamarr's director, Edgar G Ulmer has to share the blame. I'll give it a C for camp.

  • Hedy Lamarr

    • Harvey
    • 11/25/10

    If there was ever a more beautiful woman than Hedy Lamarr, it would be impossible to name her. Much like Scarlett Ohara in this role, she still is irresistable to watch.

  • Intriguing film

    • Jarrod McDonald
    • 10/13/09

    I have to say that The Strange Woman is a really intriguing film and I really like it. I have a feeling the story was diluted considerably due to the production code in place at the time. It reminds me of The Devil and Daniel Webster from earlier in the decade, especially if you compare Hedy's part with the Simone Simon role in the other film. But in many ways, this is Hedy's version of Scarlet O'Hara. There was a line where her character mentions Cleopatra, and I think Hedy would've been a great choice to have played her on film too, joining the ranks of Bara, Colbert and Taylor. I would suggest viewing two Jennifer Jones films after seeing this one, since they are similar in content: Madame Bovary and especially Ruby Gentry.

  • Almost a Casablanca

    • Naturally
    • 3/25/08

    Hedy Lamarr was a smoking-hot babe in 1946 when she played this role to the hilt. The story of the beautiful, brainy and shameless young woman from a hardscrabble background who has learned how to make men fall in love with her is both modern and timeless. I wish I had seen this film before I met my last girlfriend.Convincing performances by the supporting actors kept them from being swept off the stage by the can't-take-your-eyes-off-her Ms. Lamarr. The smart dialogue and brisk pacing are typical of the best 1940's films, and with a little more attention to some action scenes and slightly over-bearing orchestral score, The Strange Woman could have been a Casablanca-style classic.

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