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The Strange Love of Martha Ivers

The Strange Love of Martha Ivers(1946)

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The film's working titles were Love Lies Bleeding and Strange Love. This film marked the motion picture debut of Broadway actor Kirk Douglas. In her comments on the film, columnist Louella Parsons said that Paramount had "unearthed themselves another wonder boy," and the Los Angeles Daily News review said that Douglas' part "should establish [him] in Hollywood permanently." the Hollywood Reporter reviewer remarked that Douglas' "acting has qualities of more than passing interest, but there is a danger that he May be typed," while the Daily Variety review stated, he "evinces high promise for future as a dramatic actor." Van Heflin was on loan from M-G-M for this film, which marked his return to the screen after serving three years in the U.S. Army Air Corps.
       Director Lewis Milestone is quoted in an article in the Los Angeles Sun Mirror on December 8, 1946 as having said that he would never make another picture with producer Hal Wallis because Wallis wanted to reshoot scenes in this film for more close-ups of Lizabeth Scott; Milestone reportedly told Wallis to shoot them himself-which he did. Portions of the film were shot at the Southern Pacific Railroad yard in Los Angeles, CA. Jack Patrick was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Writing (Original Story). According to modern sources, Robert Aldrich replaced assistant director Dick McWhorter when filming was three-fourths completed. Modern sources also list Lorne Netten as electrician and Art Kamp as prop man.