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Seven Hills of Rome

Seven Hills of Rome(1958)

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According to the Variety review, an Italian-language version of this film was also made. Le Cloud Productions was owned by star Mario Lanza and producer Lester Welch. According to reviews, The Seven Hills of Rome was Lanza's first film in two years and his first made abroad. According to the New York World Telegram, in a highly publicized incident similar to a scene in the film, Lanza failed to perform at the last minute at a club in Las Vegas because of "turbulent personal difficulties." Renato Rascel, who played "Pepe" and wrote the song "Arrivederci, Roma," among others, was a top Italian singer and comedian. A February 6, 1958 Los Angeles Times article claimed that the song "The Seven Hills of Rome" was the last that Victor Young wrote before he died.
       A January 1957 Hollywood Reporter news item indicates that Welch had signed Rudolph Mat to direct the film. An April 1957 Hollywood Reporter news item noted that the shoot date had been pushed back from April to June due to need for additional script work. Hollywood Reporter production charts note that Giuseppe Rotunno was replaced as the film's director of photography by Tonino delli Colli. Charts also include Charles Fawcett in the cast, but his appearance in the released film has not been confirmed. Reviews praised the travelogue aspects of the film, but criticized the story. The New York Times review commented on the helicopter scene, "The views of St. Peter's Square, Ponte Palatino and various other famed Roman ruins such as the Colosseum [sic], have never, if memory serves, looked lovelier than they do in this airborne view." According to Hollywood Reporter, music supervisor George Stoll conducted the Italian National Radio Symphony, and the prerecordings were done at the Vatican's Auditorium Angelico.