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The Richest Girl in the World

The Richest Girl in the World(1934)

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An April 1934 Hollywood Reporter news item announced that RKO outbid M-G-M for the rights to Norman Krasna's original screenplay, paying the writer $4,000. At that time, the picture was being considered as a vehicle for Ann Harding. According to a June 1934 Hollywood Reporter news item, John Norton was engaged by RKO to write the screenplay for the film. The exact nature of Norton's contribution to the production has not been determined. RKO borrowed Miriam Hopkins from Paramount and Fay Wray from Twentieth Century for this production. According to a Hollywood Reporter production chart, Charles Coleman and William Burress were in the cast, but their participation in the final film has not been confirmed. Some exteriors for the film were shot at Lake Arrowhead, CA, according to Daily Variety. Krasna was nominated for an Academy Award in the Best Story category, but lost to Arthur Caesar, who wrote Manhattan Melodrama. According to modern sources, producer Pandro Berman bought Krasna's story with his own money, then sold the idea to his RKO superiors. Modern sources contend that during this period, the twenty-two-year-old Krasna was being blackballed by M-G-M's Louis B. Mayer, and as a result of this blackballing, other studios were reluctant to hire him. RKO remade Krasna's story in 1944 under the title Bride By Mistake. That film was directed by Richard Wallace and starred Laraine Day and Alan Marshall.