skip navigation
The Revolt of Mamie Stover

The Revolt of Mamie Stover(1956)

Contribute

FOR The Revolt of Mamie Stover (1956) YOU CAN

UPLOAD AN IMAGE SUBMIT A VIDEO OR MOVIE CLIP ADD ADDITIONAL INFORMATION WRITE YOUR OWN REVIEW

TCM Messageboards
Post your comments here
ADD YOUR COMMENT>

share:
Remind Me

TCMDb Archive MaterialsView all archives (1)

Shop tcm.com

The Revolt of... - NOT AVAILABLE

Crying Boy

VOTE FOR THIS TITLE:
Our records indicate this title is not available on Home Video. Vote below for it to be released on DVD.

  1. Total votes: vote now!
  2. Rank: (why vote?)

Trivia

  • Fox publicity materials claim that Jane Russell's hula number, "Keep Your Eyes on the Hands", was not originally in the film: Crew members reputedly heard it sung at a Honolulu night club while there to film exteriors, and found it so "perfect" for Russell that they incorporated it into the film.

Contributions

  • LawrenceW (2011-11-10)

    Source: not available

    The story synopsis of "The Revolt Of Mamie Stover," which appears in the 20th Century Fox studio press book, suggest that some last minute changes and edits were made the film to tone down the true nature of the Mamie Stover character. The following scenes were described in the synopsis: (1) The film opens with a scene on a street corner in San Francisco in which Mamie (Jane Russell) is "picked up" by a middle age man (portrayed by Stubby Kaye), and then detained by police who suggest she get out of town. )2) A scene occurs between Mamie and Annalee (Joan Leslie), in which Annalee tells Mamie to stay away from Jimmy (Richard Egan). (3) Mamie buys her own house on "the hill" and decorates it in anticipation of Jimmy's return from the war. (4) While Jimmy is away at war, he receives letters from both Annalee and Mamie. Annalee's are more poetic and caring, while Mamie's tell of her increasing fortune from her real-estate properties. (5) The film ends with a scene in a room at the Bungalow Club in which Jimmy rejects Mamie and leaves. Mamie walks down the hall, wipes her tears away, composes herself and enters another room, greeting her latest customer with her tag line, "You waitin' for Mamie, Honey?" This suggests that her life will continue on in same fashion as it always had: motivated by money at any cost despite a less than respectable lifestyle. The final version of the film as released redeems the Mamie character by cutting out before she greets her next customer and adding a scene in which she returns to San Francisco only to tell the police, who meet her at the dock, that she gave up her fortune and is now returning to her hometown of Leesburg, Mississippi.

Please support TCMDB by adding to this information.

Click here to contribute