skip navigation
The Resurrection of Zachary Wheeler

The Resurrection of Zachary Wheeler(1971)

Contribute

FOR The Resurrection of Zachary Wheeler (1971) YOU CAN

UPLOAD AN IMAGE SUBMIT A VIDEO OR MOVIE CLIP ADD ADDITIONAL INFORMATION WRITE YOUR OWN REVIEW

TCM Messageboards
Post your comments here
ADD YOUR COMMENT>

share:
Remind Me

TCMDb Archive MaterialsView all archives (0)

Shop tcm.com

The Resurrection... - NOT AVAILABLE

Crying Boy

VOTE FOR THIS TITLE:
Our records indicate this title is not available on Home Video. Vote below for it to be released on DVD.

  1. Total votes: vote now!
  2. Rank: (why vote?)

NOTES

powered by AFI

A working title of the film was The Resurrection of Clayton Zachary Wheeler. The end of the film, in which the identity of the new patient remains unclarified and several of the story lines are unresolved, was criticized by the Variety review as concluding "too abruptly" and leaving the viewer "a little short." Although the end credits contain a 1973 copyright statement for Gold Key Entertainment, the film was not registered with the copyright office until May 29, 1988 as PA-889-435. The viewed print also contained a 1990 copyright statement for "video, music, editing, special effects, packaging and design" for Film Ventures International, Inc.
       According to an April 1971 Hollywood Reporter news item, the film was shot in Los Angeles, CA and Albequerque, NM. Modern sources add the following actors to the cast: Linda London, Tom Peters, Steve Cory, Aly Yoder, John Bill, John Van Sickler, Dean Stewart, Steve Conte, Sue Ann Carpenter, Lois Corey, Samuel Cordova, Andy Davis, Thomas J. Conlan, Thomas Dycus, Lou DeMenno, Philip Mead, Myrna Wood, Bill Hicks, Thomas Mitman, Emanuel Smith, Gene Wilson, Tony Griego, Jim Jimmerson, Gene Wilson, Fredrick Dwuer, A. W. Samuell and Charles Tansey.
       According to a November 1971 Hollywood Reporter news item, The Resurrection of Zachary Wheeler was the first US-made feature film originating on video tape, then transferred to film through a new process developed by Vidtronics. Vidtronics had recently released 200 Motels, which was made by Vidtronic's London facility (see below). Although a letter to the editor in a May 1972 issue of Daily Variety named earlier pictures filmed on tape and released on film, the examples given were either British productions or films of live performances.