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The Prisoner of Zenda

The Prisoner of Zenda(1937)

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  • Spine-Tingling Suspense

    • TrishSaunders
    • 3/4/14

    Listen up, modern film students! This masterpiece, filmed so many decades ago, has never been bested. There are many reasons why. First, the plot is sensational, replete with intrigue, mystery, danger, love, eroticism, betrayal and redemption. Second, the ensemble features spotlessly fine silent film acting and Oscar-worthy performances from just about everyone. Mary Astor, Douglas Fairbanks, Sr. and other cast members were determined to create a work of art with this film; if there was also a high rate of return on investment, that would be fine, but it was not the overriding concern. How different can you get from modern filmmaking! See this for a crash course in why silent films have endured, why they will never be just relics from an earlier age.

  • Grand swashbuckler!

    • RedRain
    • 2/14/13

    There simply isn't a bad or mediocre performance in this entire film! Just look at the cast! Each actor, particularly Coleman and Fairbanks, is superb in his/her roles! I cannot recommend this film high enough. The story itself is terrific and there is some great swordplay as well. It is beautifully filmed, particularly the night scenes with their flickers of shadows. Just wonderful!

  • A classic adventure film

    • Mr. Blandings
    • 8/4/11

    An almost perfect film with a flawless dual performance by the great Ronald Colman, whose talent always makes it all look deceptively easy. Raymond Massey makes the perfect slimy villain, and C. Aubrey Smith and David Niven turn in great supporting performaces. The special effects of having Ronald Colman shaking hands with himself will have even the most jaded CGI fan scratching their head as to how they did it.

  • The Prisoner of Zenda (1937)

    • Mark Sutch
    • 4/14/11

    ****

  • Swashbuckler credit

    • Jill Maryn
    • 1/26/07

    I just thought it might be nice for someone to mention the professional fencing doubles used in many of these swashbuckling movies. My dad, Wilfrid J. Holroyd, Jr., was the fencing stand in for Mr. Coleman in this movie-just look at the face when the real fencing starts-that's daddy! It seemed the directors didn't try too hard to hide it. As this was such a big part of the movies of this genre, I think it's odd that not even the fencing masters who coordinated all the difficult swordplay received any credit. My dad was also in Captain Blood, Count of Monte Cristo, Three Muskateers, etc.-all made around this time. It appears as if the directors just told him to "duck his head a little", then shot the scene. Jill (Holroyd) Martyn

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