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The Prince and the Pauper

The Prince and the Pauper(1937)

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NOTES

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This was the first of twelve films in which Errol Flynn and Alan Hale worked together. News items in Hollywood Reporter note that William Dieterle filled in for William Keighley when he was ill with the flu and George Barnes replaced Sol Polito while he was ill. Press notes in AMPAS files state that the twenty-minute coronation scene took seven days to film on a set that was a duplicate of Westminster Abbey. Time notes that six unnamed technical advisors worked on the coronation scene. Motion Picture Herald notes the film was released to take advantage of the publicity surrounding the coronation of British King George VI. According to Hollywood Reporter, M-G-M bought the rights to the Mark Twain novel for $100,000 in 1935 but never filmed the story. It was to have starred Freddie Bartholomew with a script by Howard Estabrook. Other versions of the Twain story include the 1909 two reel film produced by Edison and directed by J. Searle Dawley, Paramount's 1915 film starring Marguerite Clark in the dual role of the Prince and the pauper (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1911-20; F1.3552), an Austrian film, Seine Majestat, Das Bettlekind directed by Alexander Korda, a Walt Disney version made for television and directed by Don Chaffee in 1962, another version in 1969, directed by Elliot Geisinger for Storyland Films, (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1961-70; F6.3920), and Crossed Swords, produced by the Salkind Brothers in 1978 and directed by Richard Fleischer.