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Phantom Lady

Phantom Lady(1944)

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  • Classic film noir

    • Esar Shvartz
    • 6/15/14

    A magnificent stylish noir directed by Robert Siodmak played to the hilt by Ella Rains. The photography and moody atmosphere are a delight for any noir lover.

  • A Great Film Noir

    • John McGowan
    • 11/5/13

    In my opinion this is one of the best of the early American film noirs. I liked the nuances of th film from the gum chewing detective played by Regis Toomey to the fidgety bartender harboring a secret. But the film belongs to Ella Rains who should have gone on to stardom but for some reason never reached that height. In the scene when she was trying to cull information from Elijah Cook Jr. she was sensational in that she departed from her discreet love for Alan Curtis( the accused) to a gum chewing vamp trying to lure Cook into giving up information. Franchot Tone pulled off a creepy character and Thomas Gomez as the retired cop trying to help Rains was equally believable. Also the scene at the subway platform when the bartender is just about to push Rains was very realistic.

  • Who done it?

    • Connie Smith
    • 4/23/11

    A real "nail-biter" and suspenceful film. Great camera work and chilling street and alley scenes. No current movies have us on the edge of our seats like these great black and white movie thrillers from the 1940's and 1950's.

  • FRANCHOT TONE

    • william gauslow
    • 1/27/11

    Good movie. Whoever assembled the character that Tone played really failed. I like Francot Tone, but he SUCKS in this movie.

  • Phantom Lady (1944)

    • Jay Higgins
    • 11/30/08

    Brilliant film noir, Ella Raines and Elisha Cook Jr. are magnificent, both in their best roles ever. The photography is outstanding, superb direction. I one of a kind film that is unforgettable.

  • Suberb thriller

    • alan melzak
    • 4/25/07

    A taut nerve-tingling movie from director Robert Siodmak. Based on the claustrophobic novel by Cornell Woolrich

  • Ella Raines should have won an Oscar!

    • Timothy
    • 5/6/06

    In this classic film noir, Ella Raines doesn't play the title character, but rather engages in a search for her. The phantom lady can help clear Ella's boss of the murder rap he's rotting away in jail for committing. Ella Raines' performance in this movie is as good as any Oscar-winning performance from the 40's. And the film itself is deliriously good. Especially of note: probably the most sexually charged scene ever made during the Hays Code era, when a young Elisa Cook, Jr. is playing drums in a jazz combo (sound courtesy of Buddy Rich!) and Ella's character acts out feelings of repressed sexual attracting threatening to explode all over him. Her secret, of course, is that she has no interest in him, but rather the key information he may hold about the Phantom Lady.

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