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Pardon My Sarong

Pardon My Sarong(1942)

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This was Bud Abbott and Lou Costello's first film upon returning to Universal after their free-lance performances in the M-G-M film Rio Rita . It was also the first film produced by Jules Levey's Mayfair Productions, Inc. for Universal under an agreement announced in a September 1941 Hollywood Reporter news item, in which Mayfair was designated as producer for all future Abbott and Costello films made at Universal. Despite this new agreement between Universal and Mayfair, Alex Gottlieb was retained as associate producer, a position he had held on previous Abbott and Costello films. With Pardon My Sarong, Erle C. Kenton replaced Arthur Lubin as director of the Abbott and Costello series. Numerous contemporary reviews point out that this film was a parody of the Dorothy Lamour "Sarong" films made at Paramount, such as Aloma of the South Seas (see entry above.) Hollywood Reporter reported that portions of the film were shot on location in Balboa, CA in mid-March 1942.
       Early Hollywood Reporter production charts include Maria Montez in the cast, though she does not appear in the final film. For a three-week period, Hollywood Reporter production charts mistakenly listed George Robinson as the picture's director of photography, Richard H. Riedel as the associate art director and Milton Carruth as the film editor. According to modern sources, screenwriter True Boardman claimed that the plot of this film was confusing because after he would carefully work out a plot sequence of about twelve pages, and submit them to co-screenwriter John Grant, Grant would add gags and comedy routines to the material, while removing plot development and reducing the sequence to "about three pages." Modern sources also state that Sharky, the seal was actually named Charley, the seal.