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Nowhere to Go

Nowhere to Go(1959)

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  • nowhere to go

    • kevin sellers
    • 6/19/17

    Good bleak British crime drama. Director Seth Holt handles what can often be heavy and pretentious themes of betrayal and tragedy in a blessedly laconic fashion with quick (but not too quick) pacing and a good feel for the tawdrier aspects of London in the late 50s. I especially liked how the screenplay, by Holt and the famous theatre critic Kenneth Tynan, refused to get bogged down in ponderous explanations of why the lead character was a thief or the nature and allure of criminality. I also liked George Nader's performance in the lead. With his combination of self pity, amorality, sensitivity, and desperation he etches a most believable portrait of a sociopath and comes very close to actually making the viewer care about him. Maggie Smith in one of her first roles reminds you that before she became famous playing wrinkled old dowagers she was no slouch in the fetching department. And Bernard Lee, remembered of course for playing "M" in the early Bond films, steps to the other side of the law and exhibits a great capacity for menace and sleaze. My only criticism of this otherwise fine film is that Tynan and Holt's screenplay has a couple holes, like who beat Lee's character to death and why and why did Nader's nightclub owning friend rat him out to the cops? Let's give it an A minus. P.S. To answer the previous reviewer's question, I think perhaps the last shot of Maggie S. walking downhill under a mostly dark and overcast Welsh sky, with smokestacks belching noxiousness into the air, is meant to signify a descent into hell. But I say "perhaps" because, if that were so, then why have a sliver of sunlight just below the clouds? Dontcha just love ambiguous endings?

  • What does the end mean?!

    • Kathy Well
    • 9/9/09

    I was intrigued by the downward spiraling of this early caper film. But the ending was so abrupt. What did the last scene of the girl (Maggie Smith) running toward an industrial city signify?

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