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Night Song

Night Song(1948)

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    • 5/31/14

  • The Piano Playing was Incredible

    • Larry Elam
    • 5/31/14

    I take exception to one of the previous commentators who describes Dana Andrew's piano playing as "irritating and dribble." Most major movie film shootings which involve an actor playing a piano simply avoids showing the keyboard and instead the actor pretends playing above a dead set of keys and piano music is dubbed in. When you see this in a film you instantly assume the actor in real life doesn't know how to play the piano. But this is not what happens in "Night Song." Every scene with Dana Andrews at the keyboard boldly display his fingers playing on the keys. When I see this in a film I am always curious to know whether the actor is actually playing or whether they have been well-coached to look like they are playing. In Night Song you would be hard pressed to say whether or not Andrews is actually playing the piano. Either Andrews played the piano very well or he was coached very well. In either case the piano playing in this film is neither irritating or dribble. And one particular scene where Hoagy Carmichael is transcribing notes while Andrews fervenlty plays a complicated musical composition, this is either superb piano playing or exceptional physical acting by Andrews who at the same time stays completely in character as a blind man. This is one of the most underrated films I have ever watched on TCM and it is certainly one of Andrews best performances.

  • The Piano Playing Was Incredible

    • Larry Elam
    • 5/31/14

    I take exception to one of the previous commentators who describes Dana Andrew's piano playing as "irritating and dribble." Most major movie film shootings which involve an actor playing a piano simply avoids showing the keyboard and instead the actor pretends playing above a dead set of keys and piano music is dubbed in. When you see this in a film you instantly assume the actor in real life doesn't know how to play the piano. But this is not what happens in "Night Song." Every scene with Dana Andrews at the keyboard boldly display his fingers playing on the keys. When I see this in a film I am always curious to know whether the actor is actually playing or whether they have been well-coached to look like they are playing. In Night Song you would be hard pressed to say whether or not Andrews is actually playing the piano. Either Andrews played the piano very well or he was coached very well. In either case the piano playing in this film is neither irritating or dribble. And one particular scene where Hoagy Carmichael is transcribing notes while Andrews fervently plays a very complicated musical composition, this is either superb piano playing or exceptional physical acting by Andrews who at the same time stays completely in character as a blind man. This is one of the most underrated films I have ever watched on TCM and it is certainly one of Andrews best performances.

  • Music was great and truly enjoyed Night Song

    • Lori West
    • 5/28/14

    I have watched several of Dana Andrew's movies. I have also been a fan of Merle. I liked the story line, the characters, the realism of what if this happened to you came through. The ending could have gone a few different ways, but I was not disappointed.

  • The Piano Playing Is Dreadful

    • Phil Serpico
    • 5/28/14

    I love the story line, but the piano playing by Dana Andrews is dribble and irritating.

  • TCM's synopsis tells all.

    • denscul
    • 3/7/13

    This film should have been 5 stars. Great directors, award winning cast, and even real artists like Rubenstein and Eurgene Ormandy, the writer of Stardust which at one time at least was sung and reproduced more than any other popular song. The problem with the film can probably be laid at the feet of the screenwriter. For me, the plot was too illogical and made the whole thing a long borr. Films about young composers, artists and writers usually fall flat. Films about the great, from Gershwin to Scott Fitzgerald are so far from the truth, they confused the illiterate and those who can't spell. On the other hand, my wife loved it - she had no problem with logic.,

  • NIGHT SONG

    • Roger O. Williams
    • 5/5/10

    Like the previous reviewer, michael chavez, I saw this film a long time ago, actually in 1948, the year it was released. I was 18 years old and just beginning to think about music as a career. I particularly enjoyed Leith Stevens' concerto and the fact that Artur Rubinstein (of whom I was big fan) played the work in the film. Having the excellent cast was also a big plus. I later got a degree in piano and composition and have worked as a musician and a motion picture film archivist. My own collection is mostly 16mm (and 8mm) films about music and musicians. I own a nice 16mm original print of this film and it's one of my favorites. I also would like to have a nice DVD.Other films that deal with classical music and feature pianists are The Seventh Veil, Suicide Squadron, A Song To Remember, Song Without End, Song of My Heart, and quite a few more.

  • If You Ever Missed this !

    • michael chavez
    • 10/2/09

    I am 63 years old. I first saw this movie about 1958 and languished overthe fact that I had no access to it.Many years later, the film was shown onTurner, and I was lucky enough to ready to copy it on VHS. The music of Leith Stevens is suppurb. I am still seeking to obtain the score to the Concerto, withthe idea to re-present the work to thecontempory public. It is a modern work, and very appropriate for the new audiences of today (2009). I hope to beable to copy of this film someday on DVD and I will continue to research Leith stevens and his work as the time goes on.

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