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The Night Before the Divorce

The Night Before the Divorce(1942)

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NOTES

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Gina Kaus's novel Morgen um Neun (Tommorrow at Nine) first appeared as a serial in the German magazine Die Dame (15 October-26 November 1931). An English translation of the novel, titled Tomorrow We Part, was published in the United States in 1933. The final German version of the play, written by Kaus and Ladislas Fodor, was adapted by Siegfried Geyer, while the English version, titled The Night Before the Divorce was translated and adapted by Huntley Tennyson Holme. The extent of Geyer's and Holme's contributions to the finished film, however, has not been determined. Information in the Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department, located at the UCLA Arts-Special Collections Library, indicates that both Geyer and Holme waived all rights to publicity or acknowledgment in the onscreen credits. Rights to the play were purchased by Twentieth Century-Fox in 1937, and according to the legal records and Hollywood Reporter news items, between 1937 and 1941, the following writers were assigned to work on the screenplay: Charles Kenyon, Bella Spewack, Samuel Spewack, Horace Jackson, Darrell Ware, Fidel LaBarba, Shepard Traube, Louis F. Moore and Francis Faragoh. The extent of the contributions by any of these writers to the finished film, however, has not been determined. A 1937 Hollywood Reporter news item noted that the picture was originally to be produced by Raymond Griffith and was to star Loretta Young and Tyrone Power. A 1941 Hollywood Reporter news item stated that the yacht used in the film was the Zoa III, which was owned by actor Preston Foster. Although John Brady receives onscreen credit as the picture's film editor, Hollywood Reporter production charts credit Nick DeMaggio.