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Modern Times

Modern Times(1936)

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  • Modern Times (1936)

    • Four Star Film Fan
    • 7/26/13

    Arguably the first great superstar of film, Charlie Chaplin was the man known simply as the Tramp in his silent movies. For this reason Modern Times seems like the perfect bridge between the early silent era and the age of talkies starting in the late 1920s. Chaplin had many successes earlier including The Gold Rush (1926) and City Lights (1931). However, people wanted to hear talking and soon enough everyone would have to make the transition or else die out. Because of Chaplin's popularity he was able to make one last great silent picture. From that point on however it got a lot louder in theaters. In this film the iconic Tramp character finds himself up against modern technology and the Great Depression. The whole movie seems to be critiquing factories, the police, the economy, and even modern film by using little actual dialogue. With that being said, this is a great film which exhibits everything that made Chaplin famous. He still has that walk, that mustache, and new hilarious antics to accompany everything else. Yet again there is a love story, between a tramp and a beautiful homeless girl played by Paulette Goddard (Only in the movies). Despite all the hardships they face this resilient pair amazingly still have hope. Fittingly, in the end the two lovebirds walk off into the background, seeming to bring the end of the Chaplin golden era, but also leaving us with a feeling of hope for the future.

  • Modern Times

    • Dashiell B.
    • 4/16/13

    Chaplin's last silent film and his final performance as the Little Tramp character. After going crazy and spending time in jail, a former factory worker joins a waif to make life better for themselves. Chaplin decided to keep the film mostly silent, even though it was 1936, but through pantomime, still gives a great performance with Goddard. The film serves as a commentary on unemployment, class struggle and industrialism with magnificent humour. Still relevant and humorous today as it was hysterically funny when it was first released. I give it a 5/5.

  • Modern Times

    • Mark Sutch
    • 4/13/11

    *****

  • Modern Times (1936)

    • Jay Higgins
    • 11/27/08

    Charlie Chaplin is a brilliant comedian. This film is incredible, hysterically funny, great score and an unforgettable classic and has to rank as one of the greatest films of all time. Outstanding and ingenious.

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