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Love Me Tonight

Love Me Tonight(1932)

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  • overrated

    • Dancing Doll
    • 9/7/14

    I'm a huge fan of musicals, and I found this one overrated. No dancing, male vocals were poor. The last 30 minutes gets witty and more interesting, but the first 2/3s is rather boring. It's touted the best musicals of the 30s, but I preferred Showboat. The Son of a Gun Is Nothing But a Tailor is a fun song towards the end.

  • Love me Tonight

    • Dashiell B.
    • 3/8/13

    Before "42nd Street," this was the best and most original musical ever made. A tailor is confused for a Baron and falls for a Princess. Chevalier & MacDonald are pitch-perfect in their respective parts, as is Loy who shows her flair for comedy. The technical innovations are just as memorable as Chevalier's signature song "Mimi," particularly in the famous "isn't it Romantic?" number. Proof that music and amazing storytelling are capable of coming together perfectly, serving narrative and theme. I give it a 5/5.

  • Chevalier favorite

    • Commenter77
    • 3/9/12

    I have watched this movie in part several times, but caught it tonight in full. It is a special one, and was interested in checking out these magnificent sets created for it. They were wonderful.Liked Chevalier in this particularly. I agree with some who find Jeannette McDonald's singing a bit of a trial. I don't care for most opera type singing. Get ready for some corn here: Was reminded of something Andy Griffith said about opera singing (from a comic recording), "Some people say opera is just hollerin', and it is; but it's high class hollerin'." It comes across that way to me. That quote may offend the cinematic detail oriented enthusiasts of this film - if so, sorry. However, I have enjoyed a few old operettas, thinking of "Sweet Kitty Bellairs" from 1930 featuring Claudia Dell and Walter Pidgeon. Ms. Dell was easier on the ears than Ms. McDonald. Pidgeon's singing was pleasing, and I found the piece entertaining. In watching C. Aubrey Smith in this, I thought for the umpteenth time whether he was born an old man. He is always ancient in every movie I have ever seen with him. Actually, his Hollywood films were done in his elderly years. Finally looked him up and found he was born in 1863. Wow. He did London stage, Broadway and came to Hollywood much later. He died in California at age 85.This is a good film and has interest for its genre. It is probably my favorite Chevalier. It was odd seeing Charles Ruggles in this. They were talking about Myrna Loy during the intro to the movie, saying this film may have begun her being used in something other than the Oriental evil women or vamp types. Only a few people were making the decisions on casting back then in the studio system, and thankfully, they finally broke her out of that old mold and began to find out how engaging she was as a wife and later as a comedienne.

  • Truly wonderful musical!

    • Alice Richmond
    • 4/17/11

    To me, the best musicals are ones that I can imagine on a stage--even if they'd be impossible to pull off, due to technical requirements. What I mean is that there is an immediacy to the performances that conveys to me the same feeling I get at a live theater event. I haven't spent much time analyzing what makes this so, but I think part of it is the staging (pardon the pun), part of it may be the acting experience of the cast and director (meaning: if there is a strong stagecraft component, it's likely to come across), and part of it is likely the script (meaning: if it was written for the stage, this will have an impact on the quality of the dialogue, what is show v. assumed, and and the pacing). I think one reason that modern day musical are generally inferior is that they are made like movies and read like movie treatments. Of course, I'm quite sure I'm oversimplifying something that better educated minds have discussed with a greater degree of erudition.In any case, I love this film! The performances are delightful, with lead performers and supporting cast delivering equally strong contributions. The story is fun. The music is terrific and the lyrics are very entertaining.I don't give very many films five stars, but this one deserves them! I think it's one of The Essentials.

  • Love Me Tonight

    • Mark Sutch
    • 4/9/11

    ****

  • A great musical

    • Phil Diser
    • 1/26/11

    "Love Me Tonight," (1932) is one of the great early movie musicalswith music by Rodgers & Hart. It has at least two great sequences. One is a beautiful sequence of Paris awaking that is only slowly building sound effects, no music, no talking it shows the director revelling in what sound can do! This is only three years after sound was introducedand there's nothing primitive about this scene. The second is the imaginative way the song "Isn't It Romantic" travels from Paris to a distant chateau, starting with Maruice Chevalier in Paris, carried along by others, including train passengers, & finally a troop of singing soldiers carring the song to Jeanette MacDonald in the chateau.What an idea!

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