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Love and Pain and the Whole Damned Thing

Love and Pain and the Whole Damned Thing(1973)

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  • Love and Pain and the Whole Dammed Thing

    • E. Stilwell
    • 9/17/12

    A real sleeper. A beautiful and poignant story of love transcending age and infermity With a little bit more work, it could have been a classic. I can't believe I never saw it before, but I would like to see it again. The scenes in Spain were particullarly nice for me gecause I was there in the early 1970's

  • Great story--lousy timing

    • Rich Oldrieve
    • 9/17/12

    I saw a couple of reviews asking why isn't this movie remembered more. My suggestion would be that for a sappy love story that ends with the women's death, you've got "Love Story" in 1970. For a young man and an old woman falling in love, you can't beat the camp of "Harold and Maude" in 1971. Thus, some 40 years later, when seeing "Love and Pain and the whole Damn Thing," it's hard to forget it's competition and the fact it seems to be melding both movies that preceded it by only a couple of years. Though, I think the young man's last line in this movie is far better than the earlier two.

  • The Best Overlooked Love Story in Films

    • Jose Sinclair
    • 9/6/10

    I cannot fathom why this touching love story has become so overlooked as to not be available on dvd. Maggie Smith had already won her Oscar for Prime of Miss Jean Brodie, while Timothy Bottoms had starred in The Last Picture Show and The Paper Chase. For my money, this 'May-December' romance is far far better than the story in Harold and Maude, now a cult favorite. This film is far more touching and elegant, and makes a very important statement about love: age is totally irrelevant, and love can strike when you least expect or want it. I've been moved by this movie since seeing it's theatrical release, and it remains one of my favorite all-time romances on film. It manages to be touching and poignant without sentimentality, and makes most other attempts in this vein to look mawkish and contrived by comparison.

  • A Wonderful Film! Touching, Funny and Romantic.

    • Dawn
    • 9/5/10

    This weekend, I watched this film for the first time ever. Had no idea of what to expect and was pleasantly surprised. What a beautifully bittersweet love story! I never would have expected Maggie Smith and Timothy Bottoms to have so much chemistry, but they do. Their characters are both very endearing: a couple of lonely square pegs, each of whom finds a source of love, acceptance, strength and vitality in the other. It literally made me laugh, then cry, then laugh again. The ending really got to me. So happy and yet so sad. Thanks for showing this, TCM! P.S.- To anyone who might be interested in purchasing this on DVD, it was released by Sony last year as part of their "Martini Movies" series. I'm going to add it to my collection for certain.

  • Love and Pain and the Whole Damned Thing

    • Catherine
    • 9/5/10

    I'm with Eleanor -- this is also one of my all time favorite films. Humor. Love. Impending tragedy. Maggie Smith is wonderful. Timothy Bottoms holds his own with her. I do wish it were available on DVD!

  • Sometimes you have to go after windmills....

    • Eleanor
    • 9/5/10

    This is one of my favorite films. It shows how one can fall in love under the most unusual, and not ideal, circumstances, and how even though there are difficulties, love is worth it.

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