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Pat and Mike

Pat and Mike(1952)

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According to various Hollywood Reporter news items, James Arness, Frank Otto and Alan Dinehart, III were cast, but they were not in the released film. Portions of the film were shot on location at the Riviera Country Club in Los Angeles and in the Cow Palace in San Francisco. Several popular golf and tennis stars portrayed themselves in the film, including Babe Didrikson Zaharias, the most celebrated woman golfer of all time. According to the film's presskit, Frank Parker, who appeared as himself in the film, also acted as a technical advisor and tennis coach to Katharine Hepburn.
       According to contemporary and modern sources, Hepburn, an excellent athlete in real life, did all of her own tennis and golf scenes in Pat and Mike. According to biographical sources, Hepburn was a junior golf champion as a child, and press materials noted that Hepburn was once a runner-up in the Connecticut Women's Golf Championship. As noted in some reviews and modern sources, the sports sequences in the film were filmed in a newsreel/documentary style.
       Modern sources have commented on the effectiveness of Spencer Tracy's use of a "Bronx" accent in his portrayal of "Mike Conovon." In a scene from the film that is often shown in documentaries about Tracy and Hepburn's careers and offscreen relationship, "Mike" looks at "Pat" and remarks, "Not much meat on her, but what's there is 'cherce.'" Pat and Mike was the seventh of nine co-starring films for Tracy and Hepburn, and the second of two collaborations with writers Garson Kanin and Ruth Gordon, who also wrote their popular 1949 film Adam's Rib (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1941-50).
       Kanin and Gordon received an Academy Award nomination for their story and screenplay. According to a 1973 Daily Variety news item, a television series based on the film was being developed for comedian Buddy Hackett, but the series was never aired.