skip navigation
The Lady Takes a Sailor

The Lady Takes a Sailor(1949)

TCM Messageboards
Post your comments here
ADD YOUR COMMENT>

share:
Remind Me

TCMDb Archive MaterialsView all archives (0)

USER REVIEWS

user reviews

See Detailed Ratings
    Acting of Lead Performers
    Acting of Supporting Cast
    Director
    Music Score
    Title Sequence
  • No Ratings Available Add Yours Now
    Screenplay
    Cinematography
    Historical Importance
    Would You Recommend?
  • 0 Member Ratings

Add your ratings! Each of the detailed ratings you select will result in a cumulative score for this film.

You can also write a review by clicking here. Your review will then be posted for everyone to read.

Thank You!

We have received your ratings and calculated them into the overall user ratings for this title.

You can also write a review by clicking here. Your review will then be posted for everyone to read.

    Rate the acting of the Lead Performers
    Rate the acting of the Supporting Cast
    Rate the Director
    Rating of the Music Score
    Rating of the Title Sequence
    Screenplay
    Creatively uses the camera to tell the story
    Importance in Cinema history
    Would you recommend for fans of this genre
Submit Ratings Cancel Write a Review Read Reviews

*By submitting your contribution, you agree to TCM's Terms of Use. TCM will use your personal information consistent with our Privacy Policy

NO REVIEWS AVAILABLE

The title has not been reviewed. Be the first to write a review by clicking here to start.

  • the lady takes a sailor

    • kevin sellers
    • 1/13/17

    Despite a title that promises at least mild salaciousness, this is yet another sanitized comedy about a woman renouncing an interesting job (kind of a 1940s version of Ralph Nader) for a not very interesting man (Let's be kind and just say that Dennis Morgan is a poor man's Gig Young.) Everett Freeman's screenplay has a few Sturgean moments, especially with the always snappy Eve Arden, as well as Tom Tully's inept safecracker ("I'd jimmy the lock, but I don't want to be pretentious"), however there are no sustained scenes of comic verbal fireworks and the physical comedy, as directed by Michael Curtiz, is flat out bad. (That has to be the most unfunny comedic car chase this side of "Mad Mad World.") As for Jane Wyman she underplays it which is, considering how stolid the material, a wise choice, either on her part or Curtiz's. Give it a C. P.S. If you're gonna set a film on Long Island you really shouldn't have the Santa Monica mountains in the background! I mean, if this were a genuinely hilarious movie I wouldn't care, but considering this film's overall mediocrity it's really annoying.

  • DVD desired

    • Diane
    • 12/30/16

    Very re-watchable. Would love to get it on DVD.

  • A Gem!

    • Maria Ramos
    • 12/4/14

    What a great romantic comedy. Jane Wyman at her best and she is so funny! Dennis Morgan is great! A real gem needs to be shown more often. I'm disappointed that there is no article on this film.

  • The Lady Takes a Sailor (1949)

    • Celia Trimboli
    • 4/8/10

    Little seen Jane Wyman screwball comedy. Very hilarious at times. Great movie.

  • Your Name
  • Your Email (optional)
  • Your Location (optional)
      Rate the acting of the Lead Performers
      Rate the acting of the Supporting Cast
      Rate the Director
      Rating of the Music Score
      Rating of the Title Sequence
      Screenplay
      Creatively uses the camera to tell the story
      Importance in Cinema history
      Would you recommend for fans of this genre

  • Title of your Review
  • Your Review

    Character Limit! You have reached the 2,000 word character limit for this review.

  • Preview & Submit Cancel Submit Review Go Back
Thank You!

We have received your ratings and calculated them into the overall user ratings for this title.

Click the button below to read reviews and see your posting:

Close Detailed Ratings (optional)

*We protect your personal infortmation and will not provide it to anyone without your consent. For a complete explanation, please refer to TCM's Privacy Policy. By submitting your contribution, you agree to TCM's Terms of Use.