skip navigation
The Lady and the Monster

The Lady and the Monster(1944)

Contribute

FOR The Lady and the Monster (1944) YOU CAN

UPLOAD AN IMAGE SUBMIT A VIDEO OR MOVIE CLIP ADD ADDITIONAL INFORMATION WRITE YOUR OWN REVIEW

TCM Messageboards
Post your comments here
ADD YOUR COMMENT>

share:
Remind Me

TCMDb Archive MaterialsView all archives (0)

Shop tcm.com

The Lady and the... - NOT AVAILABLE

Crying Boy

VOTE FOR THIS TITLE:
Our records indicate this title is not available on Home Video. Vote below for it to be released on DVD.

  1. Total votes: vote now!
  2. Rank: (why vote?)

NOTES

powered by AFI

The working titles of this film were Donovan's Brain, The Monster and the Lady, The Monster's Castle, The Monster and The Brute. Although Tom London is listed on the CBCS in the role of "Husky man," reviews credit Jack Kirk with that role. The title and composer of the song sung by Janet Martin have not been determined. The picture marked Josephine Dillon's first film in more than a decade and former ice skater Vera Hruba Ralston's first dramatic screen performance.
       According to information in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS Library, the PCA rejected the first two drafts of the film's screenplay due to the participation of "Patrick Cory" in the removal of "Donovan's" brain. In early versions of the screenplay, Donovan was still alive at the time of the experiment, and was killed by the removal of his brain. The PCA insisted that Cory be punished for his crime, and also that there be no indication of an illicit relationship between Cory and "Janice."
       In 1949, the picture was re-edited and re-released as The Tiger Man. Other films based on Curt Siodmak's best-selling novel include the 1953 Dowling Production Donovan's Brain, which was directed by Felix Feist and starred Lew Ayres and Nancy Davis; a 1955 CBS televison film, entitled Donovan's Brain and starring Wendell Cory; and a 1962 British film entitled Vengeance, which was directed by Freddie Francis and starred Peter Van Eyck and Anne Heywood. In May 1944, Orson Welles starred in the two-part CBS Suspense radio presentation of Donovan's Brain, which, according to a September 1943 Hollywood Reporter news item, was based on the screenplay of the Republic film.