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The Great Sioux Massacre

The Great Sioux Massacre(1965)

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Crying Boy

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FULL SYNOPSIS

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A United States Army disciplinary court charges Major Reno with responsibility for the slaughter at Custer's Last Stand. Captain Benton takes the stand to refute the charges against Reno and take the blame for the Sioux massacre of cavalry troops headed by Col. George Armstrong Custer. He relates the situations that led Custer and his men to slaughter on the banks of the Little Big Horn River. Captain Benton joins Custer's staff because they both believe that the Indians should receive fair treatment from the United States Government. Soon Benton meets Major Reno's daughter Caroline, and they fall in love. Colonel Custer accuses powerful government officials in Washington, D.C., of cheating the Indians through deals with corrupt Indian agents, and, as a result, he loses his command and lives in forced retirement. Sen. James Blaine approaches Custer and offers his reinstatement and a chance to become President of the United States if he will agree to oppress the Indians. Thinking he will become a public hero, Custer, accompanied by a reporter, compromises his principles and murders Indians at every chance. Encouraged by his ambitious wife, Libbie, Custer follows orders to lead his men into a great battle against the Sioux. When he and his forces reach the Little Big Horn River, the Indian units, led by Chiefs Crazy Horse and Sitting Bull, prove stronger. The Sioux kill Custer and massacre his soldiers. After Benton finishes the story, the military board decides that nothing amiss has occurred and ends the inquiry.