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Gentleman's Agreement

Gentleman's Agreement(1948)

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  • Just a little correction ...

    • Cristina G.
    • 10/17/14

    I meant that when I saw the movie again recently, I wished Phil had ended up with ANNE, the Celeste Holm character. I believe she and Phil were a better match because they shared the same views on most subjects and their opposite personalities seemed more right together, with him, quiet and serious, and her, funny and outgoing. Anyway, it's just one movie about a man writing a series of articles about anti-Semitism and how this affects his relationships with and reactions towards other people. I think it's not so much about anti-Semitism, really, but more about one man writing about it and how this affects his life.

  • I liked this movie a lot

    • Cristina G.
    • 10/15/14

    When I first saw this movie when I was a teenager, I was disappointed that it spent so much time on showing people talking/arguing about anti-Semitism when they'd already shown what anti-Semitic treatment Phil Green (Gregory Peck) experienced while he was pretending to be Jewish. The talking was redundant, in my view. I wished that the relationships between the major characters had been fleshed out more, esp. those between Phil and the two young women interested in him. The love angle interested me more back then, and I was glad that Phil ended up with Cathy.When I saw the movie again recently, I still wished that the relationships between the main characters were explored more deeply, but I liked the movie a lot more. I did find it hard to believe that Phil Green, a clearly successful writer and experienced man of the world, would suddenly get so passionate about anti-Semitism after just 6 weeks of being at the receiving end of such discrimination. I just decided that maybe his reaction was meant to highlight the difference between the reaction of someone new to such an experience compared to the reactions of those who'd been experiencing it for years, like his Jewish bestfriend and his Jewish secretary, who'd both clearly learned to ignore and to live with such treatment. The love angle still interested me a lot more, but this time I wished Phil had ended up with Jane.

  • Gentlemen's Agreement from a Jew's perspective

    • Evan
    • 9/27/14

    I love this movie. Leonard Maltin may consider it tame perhaps because it isn't abrasive. It is so very true, accurate in its intensity and should often be watched to help dispel prejudices of any kind. I grew up as Jewish girl attending a private, highly "elite," then all-girl New England school where, until my family, no Jews had attended. The education was wonderful! The anti-Semitism was unrelenting and, all but for a few teachers and a few students, heavily, tacitly agreed upon. But it was not always silent. Once a girl poured a bottle of ink over me, yelling "filthy Kike." I was NE and RI tennis champion but not invited onto the school's team until I asked why and then I tried out, perhaps experiencing my greatest nervousness on the court, since no one wanted me to make it, but I did. Other kids couldn't have me into their homes and one threw up while over our house for dinner (the one time someone did), for, as she confessed to us, she'd been warned not to eat our food off our plates with our implements. In tennis, I was not allowed to enter the clubhouses where I won the tournaments. Where my coach was pro and I practiced daily, I couldn't drink from the bubbler (water) or he'd be fired, despite his own fame. I was one of the best students, soloist in the Glee Club, had good or star parts in any Drama Club play, the only student ever admitted to both clubs, as a note. This reviling attitude is irrational. Such was the degree of well taught hatred and superiority that permeated minds and hearts. And I imagine that, despite all fronts, this very same exists to this day within this social strata. Ironic and so like Planet Earth to have the top social strata covertly harbor the most hatred but I'd bet on it. I LOVE this movie! The excuses, habits, complicit Jews, cruelty, noses in the air and the courageous...all shown truthfull

  • Gentlemen's Agreement from a Jew's perspective

    • Evan
    • 9/26/14

    I love this movie. Leonard Maltin may consider it tame because it isn't abrasive and doesn't insult with crass remarks any sort of person as likely in a modern movie and as one finds blighting the internet these days. It is so very true, accurate in its intensity and should often be watched to help dispel prejudices of any kind. I grew up as Jewish girl attending a private, highly "elite," then all-girl New England school where, until my family, no Jews had attended. The education was wonderful! The anti-Semitism was unrelenting and, all but for a few teachers and a few students, heavily, tacitly agreed upon. But it was not always silent. Once a girl poured a bottle of ink over me, yelling "filthy Kike." I was NE and RI tennis champion but not invited onto the school's team until I asked why and then I tried out, perhaps experiencing my greatest nervousness on the court, since no one wanted me to make it, but I did. Other kids couldn't have me into their homes and one threw up while over our house for dinner (the one time someone did), for, as she confessed to us, she'd been warned not to eat our food off our plates with our implements. In tennis, I was not allowed to enter the clubhouses where I won the tournaments. Where my coach was pro and I practiced daily, I couldn't drink from the bubbler (water) or he'd be fired, despite his own fame. I was one of the best students, soloist in the Glee Club, had good or star parts in any Drama Club play, the only student ever admitted to both clubs, as a note. This reviling attitude is irrational. Such was the degree of well taught hatred and superiority that permeated minds and hearts. And I imagine that, despite all fronts, this very same exists to this day within this social strata. Ironic and so like Planet Earth to have the top social strata covertly harbor the most hatred but I'd bet on it. I LOVE this movie! The excuses, habits, complicit Jews, cruelty, noses in the air and the courageous...all shown truthfully.

  • Gentlemen's Agreement from a Jew's perspective

    • Evan Symonds
    • 9/26/14

    I love this movie. Leonard Maltin may consider it tame because it isn't abrasive and doesn't insult with crass remarks any sort of person as likely in a modern movie and as one finds blighting the internet these days. It is so very true, accurate in its intensity and should often be watched to help dispel prejudices of any kind. I grew up as Jewish girl attending a private, highly "elite," then all-girl New England school where, until my family, no Jews had attended. The education was wonderful! The anti-Semitism was unrelenting and, all but for a few teachers and a few students, heavily, tacitly agreed upon. But it was not always silent. Once a girl poured a bottle of ink over me, yelling "filthy Kike." I was NE and RI tennis champion but not invited onto the school's team until I asked why and then I tried out, perhaps experiencing my greatest nervousness on the court, since no one wanted me to make it, but I did. Other kids couldn't have me into their homes and one threw up while over our house for dinner (the one time someone did), for, as she confessed to us, she'd been warned not to eat our food off our plates with our implements. In tennis, I was not allowed to enter the clubhouses where I won the tournaments. Where my coach was pro and I practiced daily, I couldn't drink from the bubbler (water) or he'd be fired, despite his own fame. I was one of the best students, soloist in the Glee Club, had good or star parts in any Drama Club play, the only student ever admitted to both clubs, as a note. This reviling attitude is irrational. Such was the degree of well taught hatred and superiority that permeated minds and hearts. And I imagine that, despite all fronts, this very same exists to this day within this social strata. Ironic and so like Planet Earth to have the top social strata covertly harbor the most hatred but I'd bet on it. I LOVE this movie! The obdurate, the coy, the covert, the cruel and the brave...all shown bluntly.

  • A still relevant film

    • David H.
    • 9/24/14

    I disagree with Leonard Matlin that Gentleman's Agreement seems "tame now" than when it was made during the Post-war era. Gregory Peck is stalwart as a writer who pretends to be Jewish in order to write a story on anti-Semitism, but it is Dorothy McGuire as his girl friend who steals the film. She shares Peck's views on prejudice, but is ambivalent about following through on them. John Garfield and the rest of the cast are also first rate. Anti-Semitism may no longer be as prevalent, but there are plenty of other prejudices around and how people deal with them is as relevant today as it was in 1947.

  • John Garfield, born Jacob Julius Garfinkle

    • Edie Abrams
    • 9/23/14

    According to Wikipedia, Garfield was born to Russian Jewish immigrants, and grew up in the heart of the Yiddish Theater District on the Lower East Side. He had a heart condition, so was turned down by the armed forces during WWII. Instead, he helped Bette Davis establish a canteen for GIs, among other activities. In Gentleman's Agreement, Garfield took a featured, but supporting, part because he believed deeply in the film's expos of anti-Semitism in America. Because of the McCarthy hearings during the "Red Scare," he was blacklisted from future employment for the remainder of his career. He died at 39.

  • Wow--Make U Think!

    • F. Parker
    • 6/23/14

    Gregory Peck is outstanding! He's so tall, handsome and commanding. His passion and sincerity is felt through out this entire movie. His willingness to "fake" play a Jewish person, to pull out the evils of this time is to be marveled. I'm so glad that Dorothy McGuire, his love interest finally gets it in the end, that's all he wanted was for the non-affected good, Christians to make a stand against this evil. Great movie now and for years to come. TCM great pick for the audience.

  • Guilt Complex

    • Jack The Hat
    • 6/22/14

    Year after year the liberal film industry keeps the guilt complex going. One would have to believe that Hollywood is without prejudice. They love everybody, well not everybody. Christians and conservatives and--well you know. Want to know if your prejudice? Answer this question, If your doctor set up an appointment for you and he had an office in a Jewish neighborhood and an office in a black neighborhood---which office would you choose to visit and why?

  • Thoughtfully-Made, Insightful Film - A Classic

    • Raymond Shaw
    • 6/21/14

    I'm a young person who watched this film for the first time not too long ago, and I must say I find it extremely relevant even in today's times. The subtlety of Kathy's (Dorothy McGuire) prejudice that lies at the plot's heart is presented so effectively, showing the often-ignored, neglected, and ultimately more damaging and pervading side of bigotry. As Edmund Burke so eloquently put it, "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing." I whole-heartedly recommend this film to all of today's youth (and also our elders!), and consider it a classic for the ages.

  • Consider the Times this Film Was Made

    • Kathleen O'Brien
    • 2/13/14

    Consider the times in which this film was made. Anti-Semitism was completely accepted. Even in the 80's when we bought a home in a Darien-type New England town, agents screened out Jewish people (which we didn't know until we moved in. Very repressive place.) Actually I read the studio considered not releasing it because of the reaction.I too wonder why this film is so rarely if ever shown on TCM and why it's not featured in the pre-Oscar lineup, particularly given some of the ghastly films being shown in that regard (last night's with Elizabeth Hartman and Geraldine Page was one of the worst films I have ever seen, although I admit I didn't get through it) "Gentlemen's Agreement" won Best Picture and Celeste Holm won Best Supporting Actress. This film was written by Moss Hart, one of the finest. It should be shown and often. WHY NOT?Finally, I read the book and this film is totally true to the story. Loaded with talent and reality. The film's focus was to take on bigotry among the "nice" people. It couldn't do everything, but it's focus was very well-done.Kathleen

    • 8/22/13

  • Gentleman's Agreement

    • Carol Parise
    • 8/12/12

    One of Gregory Peck's best... I don't know why it doesn't get scheduled for more air time than it rarely does.

  • Gentleman's Agreement

    • Dashiell Barnes
    • 2/6/12

    This is an essential film for the fans of Elia Kazan. The story is more tamed today, but it still explores the major issues of anti- semitism & responding to prejudice. The entire cast give sincere performances, although I thought Garfield gave too brief a performance. All in all, a good film. I give it a 3.5/5.

  • Jews are people too, but we still hate blacks

    • Erik Wagner
    • 1/6/12

    Having won over "Miracle on 34th Street", "The Bishop's Wife" and "Great Expectations" is just dumb. Any of those would have been better picks; "Miracle" would be mine, 'cause I love Maureen O'Hara and believing in Santa. ("Crossfire" was nominated too, but I haven't seen that). It won, not because it was a great film but because it was touching on important social issues, racism and bigotry. Audiences of the day must have felt this was groundbreaking; it was shocking how Jews couldn't get into country clubs. Thank god we've come so far. It really is amazing how, in 20 years, it went from dribble like this to "Raisin in the Sun" and "In the Heat of the Night". We are just two years after WWII, so perhaps the horror of the Holocaust made Jewish culture the Africa of today in some weird way. And you feel that they really are trying, though with the heaviest hammer they could find. But in the background is constant repression of women and blacks; it's hard to focus on what's in the foreground. There are some real nice moments, basically all the scenes between Gregory Peck and Dorothy McGuire, two kick-ass actors, but the script is so expected and contrived today. You feel the attempt, but it would never actually move anyone in the right direction today.

  • Grandioso

    • Daniele
    • 11/8/10

    Um filme sensacional que trata do preconceito e da intolerncia e vai nas profundezas da ignorncia humana. Um excelente filme que deveria ser exibido mais vezes no TCM.

  • Good intentions

    • Steve Brook
    • 2/22/10

    A well-intentioned movie which makes some good points. It was made just two years after the Holocaust ended, BUT there was not even a hint in the movie that around six million Jews had recently been murdered. And one of the key characters, John Garfield, played a Jewish GI!

  • Gregory Peck Takes on Anti-Semitism

    • Kyrstal74
    • 6/20/09

    Gregory Peck plays a reporter assigned to do a story on anti-semitism in the US. At first he's reluctant to do it since has can't think of a new angle to broach the subject. But, then, he decides to pretend to be Jewish, like an anthropologist doing participant-observer ethnography, only he's doing it as an investigative journalist. He's stunned to find out that his own finacee's upper class family lives by what's called a "gentleman's agreement" to keep people of the Jewish faith out of spaces where the dominant Christian people work, play and live. As a journalist who's undercover as Jewish, he experiences first hand Christian supremacism, most especially by people in the upper classes of US society. One of his friends is Jewish (John Garfield). He helps him comprehend the fuller impact of what it is to live as a Jew in the US being oppressed individually, socially and institionally by anti-semites who are in denile that they are prejudice or practicing discrimination. In fact, they are clueless.

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