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The Falcon Takes Over

The Falcon Takes Over(1942)

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  • Celebrating Saunders & Allen Jenkins

    • Will Fox
    • 11/7/17

    Classic comedy characters can casually communicate clearly, producing pleasures for us. The first 3 Falcon Films (1941 -1942), feature the snappiest scripts and the most sizzling dialogues between A-List star, George Saunders and the often overlooked genius, produced by one of the funniest scene-stealers of all time. Saunders' wisecracking sidekick, "Goldy," Allen Jenkins is one of the great, classic comedy characters. The Falcon's foils are crooks, the chief cop and his dim-bulb buddy, Bates, who often offers unintentionally, ironic quips, stimulating viewers' bemused smiles. Allen Jenkins' jokes jump up to higher levels, brilliantly illuminating insights, ironic and unexpectedly funny. He delights us. Jenkins delivers twice as many, naturally funny jokes per hour vs. Bates, and more impressively, vs. any decent comic, i.e. any 5 Bob Hope highlights shows, combined. Allen Jenkins has outstanding comedic timing and savvy body language, slyly multiplying his punchline impacts, while wisely moving the film's plot lines, including the whodunit mysteries for the Falcon and for us in the audience to solve. Be sure to see "The Falcon Takes Over" (1942, 4 stars). This is Jenkins' winsome swansong in 3rd Falcon film. His career included playing cops, gangsters to buddies in many movies 1930s - 40s. Then 50s TV series i.e. I Love Lucy. In 1960s he was Officer Dibble's voice in Top Cat cartoons. His final film (1974, 11 days before dying) was in "The Front Page." Allen Jenkins' was the 7th member of the Screen Actors Guild.

  • B-movie brings its A-game

    • Mike
    • 5/5/13

    So good you want to live there. A cast of scene stealers, Bond is uncommonly scary, Bari is an eye magnet, Gleason is in rare form, Jenkins and Sanders host the party.

  • Thought I was hallucinating!

    • r
    • 5/4/13

    Sitting here with my wife on a rainy day in Georgia...a few minutes into the movie my wife says "Isn't that that Mike Masurki guy you were telling me about?' "No dear, that's Ward Bond...remember 'Wagon Train'?"As the plot & film unfolded, we KNEW we had just seen this a few weeks ago...was it a Boston Blackie? an old Dick Tracy? maybe 'The Whistler'?Nope. A "premake" of "Murder My Sweet" with Dick Powell. TCM might try running them back to back some day for film buffs. This was good, but preferred the Mike Masurki version!

  • very good

    • Alice
    • 4/30/12

    I missed the first 15 or so minutes, which, I think, were very important. It looks so good. Would you please show this film again? Thank you, TCM for showing such great film classics. It is because of you, I have grown to love these old films.

  • Vaguely Familiar

    • TimothyLeise
    • 3/1/08

    Reading the synopsis, and seeing the great Ward Bond's character's name, one can recognize this as an early and altered version of Raymond Chandler's "Farewell, My Lovely". That was, you recall, made as "Murder, My Sweet" with Dick Powell in his image altering portrayal of Philip Marlowe. That film noire classic also starred Claire Trevor, and featured Mike Mazurky as "Moose Malloy", the name sported by Bond in this Falcon film.

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