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Every Girl Should Be Married

Every Girl Should Be Married(1948)

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NOTES

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Don Hartman's screen credit reads: "Produced, directed and co-written by Don Hartman." According to Hollywood Reporter, Barbara Bel Geddes was to star in this picture. Betsy Drake, who made her screen debut in the film, was cast instead. The New York Times review notes that Drake met co-star Cary Grant in London while she was acting in the stage play Deep Are the Roots. Grant was "reportedly intrigued by her evident talent and charm," and "when she came home...she went to Hollywood, called Mr. Grant, who arranged a screen test for her...." Modern sources claim that Grant not only supervised a rewrite of Drake's role to include some of her mannerisms, but directed much of the finished film as well. Modern sources also state that Grant instructed Drake to play the part like a young Katharine Hepburn. In its review, Variety praised Drake, stating, "In a long part that keeps her within camera range for the full length of the film, Miss Drake's performance is a tour de force in the romantic comedy vein." The New York Times review compared Drake favorably to Margaret Sullavan and called her a "refreshingly natural comic spirit" with "considerable promise of more formidable triumphs on the screen." Drake and Grant were married in 1949 and divorced ten years later. They appeared in one more film together, the 1952 picture Room for One More. Actress Lois Hall, who starred in adventure serials in the early 1950s, made her motion picture debut in Every Girl Should Be Married. Modern sources note that the film was RKO's most lucrative production of 1948, making $775,000 in profits. Grant and Drake reprised their roles in a June 27, 1949 Lux Radio Theatre broadcast.