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Day the World Ended

Day the World Ended(1956)

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Crying Boy

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NOTES

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The film opens with footage of a nuclear explosion, which is followed by a written statement: "What you are about to see May never happen...but to this anxious age in which we live, it presents a fearsome warning...Our Story begins with...The End!" Opening title credits appear after this prologue. Following the credits, an offscreen narrator explains that the ensuing scenes of devastation, which include deserted cities, reflect "TD Day: total destruction by nuclear weapon." There is no further narration in the film. At the end of the film, the final title card reads "The Beginning."
       Although a Hollywood Reporter news item reported that production was to begin on September 15, 1955, Hollywood Reporter production charts listed the production between 9 September and September 16, 1955. According to reviews and the pressbook, Day the World Ended was released as part of a double bill with The Phantom from 10,000 Leagues . In a modern interview, Roger Corman noted that the film was to be set in 1970, and that it was primarily shot on location in Bronson Canyon in Los Angeles, and at the Sportsmen's Lodge in Studio City, CA.
       A modern source implies that the creature in the film was the transformed former fianc of the character "Louise." Although this is not explicitly stated, it May be implied in a scene in which Louise gazes fondly at a photo of herself and a boyfriend after she hears the creature nearby. Producer-director Roger Corman appears as Louise's beau in the photograph. Modern sources also add the following information about the production: The film was shot in ten days for a total production cost of $96,000; the film's initial exhibition was in December 1955 in Detroit, MI.