skip navigation
Crime, Inc.

Crime, Inc.(1945)

TCM Messageboards
Post your comments here
ADD YOUR COMMENT>

share:
Remind Me

TCMDb Archive MaterialsView all archives (0)

DVDs from TCM Shop

Crime, Inc. MORE > $6.98 Regularly $6.98 Buy Now

NOTES

powered by AFI

DVDs from TCM Shop

Crime, Inc. MORE > $6.98
Regularly $6.98
buy now

The film's opening credits are preceded by a shot of the following letter from FBI director J. Edgar Hoover, dated August 27, 1935 and addressed to writer/producer Martin Mooney, who was then a New York crime reporter: "Dear Mr. Mooney: I am pleased to learn of the progress you have made on your book 'Crime, Incorporated.' I feel that books of its type, written by experts in their respective fields, such as yourself, possess a vital influence in arousing the American public to the continuing, widespread menace of crime throughout our country today, particularly in our urban centers." According to an April 1944 news item, Mooney's book Crime, Incorporated exposed Louis Lepke Buchalter, James J. Hines, federal judge Martin T. Manton and Willie Bioff as criminals, and caused then New York governor Herbert H. Lehman to appoint Thomas E. Dewey as a special prosecutor. According to the same item, Harry Wurtzel was first assigned to produce the picture, James Tinling was to direct, and J. Carrol Naish was to star. Mooney was announced first as the film's technical advisor, but in early September 1944, he replaced Wurtzel as producer.
       War Dept. records contained at NARS indicate that Crime, Inc. was "disapproved" for export by the Office of Censorship, Los Angeles Board of Review on January 16, 1945, because of its depiction of "organized criminal activities, murders and general lawlessness." According to a November 1, 1944 Hollywood Reporter news item, Producers Releasing Corp. anticipated the Board's reaction but went ahead with production because it felt that by the time the film was ready for export, the war would be over and the Board, disbanded. Crime, Inc. marked singer Martha Tilton's first dramatic role. Hollywood Reporter news items and production charts add Carl O'Bryan but his appearance in the final film has not been confirmed.