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Cloak and Dagger

Cloak and Dagger(1946)

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NOTES

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The book by Corey Ford and Alastair MacBain appeared serially in Collier's from 6 October-October 27, 1945. This film was the first production of United States Pictures, Inc., formed by Joseph Bernhard and Milton Sperling. The picture also marked actress Lilli Palmer's American film debut. Hollywood Reporter news items add the following information about the production: Major General William J. Donovan, director of the O.S.S., wanted his close friend James Cagney to star, but Cagney turned down the role. The air strip and bomber sequence scenes were shot on location at the Providencia Ranch in Universal City, CA, while other scenes were shot in Bronson Canyon, Los Angeles. The production shut down for a week in June 1946 when Gary Cooper became ill with the flu.
       A studio press release noted that technical advisor Michael Burke was a lieutenant in the U.S. naval reserve and had worked with the French Maquis. He was awarded the Silver Star for service in Italy in 1942. Technical advisor Andreis Deinum was a cryptographer for the O.S.S. According to modern sources, the film originally had a final reel in which "Polda" has a heart attack aboard the airplane and dies. Working with a clue obtained from a photograph in Polda's wallet, the O.S.S. discover the former site of an atomic power plant in Germany. Following this discovery, "Alvah" warns, "God help us Americans if we think we can keep atomic power for ourselves alone." Modern sources add that the message of this ending was the reason Lang made the film. Palmer reprised her role in a Lux Radio Theatre broadcast on May 3, 1948, co-starring Ronald Reagan.