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City That Never Sleeps

City That Never Sleeps(1953)

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  • As a chorus Line Dancer in The Movie

    • Katheran Acmorsoni
    • 12/13/10

    Being in this movie was a great adventure for me. As the movie started I was the first one you saw standing on stage. Seeing it again at this time of my life I realize how much it showed some of the activity and the look of the city at that time. The Silver Frolics club is gone. Under the club where the gambling took place is also gone. The way the movie was made shows the flavor of the times. The story is also full of interesting events and covering different smaller stories. The machanical man that sees all that is going on on the street. The women who was having a baby close to where the gambling was going on, Gig up on the L tracks and his chase scene showing lots of the city as it was then. Gig with his angle partner trying to keep Gig on the right side of the law.As I see it now, I think it has value historicly and the movie as a whole I think is worth seeing. Acmorsoni@att.net

  • Lost odd gem

    • Thomas Emmrich
    • 10/12/10

    I feel very grateful that I was able to see this film a few months ago in Chicago at the Music Box theatre during a film noir festival. The only print that exists is owned by Martin Scorsese, and he was gracious enough to loan it to the festival for continued support in the preservation of our american film history. The films narrative is pretty strait forward, a disillusioned second generation beat cop(Gig Young) wants to leave his wife and the force to be with a nightclub dancer. His father, a detective on the force wants him to follow in his footsteps and give his younger brother a good example to follow. The city has many stories and this is just the main one, other examples are a two bit ex-magician turned criminal, a dirty defense lawyer and his wife, and a street performer that acts as a mechanical man in the night club window. The film shows how the city brings all these characters together. Chill Wills plays the voice of the city and a odd fellow that is Gig Young's new partner/guardian angel. With a supporting cast rounded out by William Talman and Marie Windsor, this is most definitely a film that needs to be preserved and screened for future generations of fans.

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