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Christmas in July

Christmas in July(1940)

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  • christmas in july

    • kevin sellers
    • 12/29/18

    Solid Sturges film. Not as good as "Sullivan" or "Morgan's Creek", mind you, but still a nice blend of sentimentality and cynicism that is this director's hallmark, in my opinion. Lots of good stuff. I especially liked Ellen Drew's climactic soliloquy in defense of her helplessly Capitalistic boyfriend, made all the more affecting because of Ms. Drew's relative silence throughout most of the film, the relaxed yet energetic performance of Dick Powell as said boyfriend, the sardonic fulminations of Raymond Walborn's coffee tycoon, Harry Hayden's surprisingly supportive office manager, the fawning staff of Shindel's Dept. Store, the opening scene between Powell and Drew on the apartment rooftop, with the NYC skyline at night in the background promising riches and fame, that is so Capra-esque, and the equally great last scene where Sturges indulges his inner Billy Wilder by having the elevator carrying the love birds descend to the basement as a black cat looks on. Counterbalancing the above are a criminally under utilized William Demarest, a Hitler joke that falls far short of Lubitsch and for a brief spell casts a pall over the proceedings, and a predictable denouement. So let's give it a B plus. P.S. Not much of a cameo by Sturges. I expected more after Ben M closed his intro by mentioning it.

  • Thank You

    • Judi
    • 1/17/10

    So much for playing this movie in December! I waited so long for this movie I saw as a young girl. And you did not disappoint! Thanks TCM!

  • Great Movie

    • RBS
    • 7/28/09

    Still one of the most underrated of Sturges films, this film has so many layers: race, class, media, all wrapped in typical Sturges wit and manic hilarity. Worth seeking out.

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