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Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid

Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid(1969)

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Trivia

  • Warren Beatty turned down the role of Sundance in favor of a role in Only Game in Town, The (1970).
  • Director George Roy Hill originally cast 'Redford, Robert' as Butch and 'Newman, Paul' as Sundance. It was at Redford's suggestion that they switched roles.
  • 'McQueen, Steve' was offered and accepted the role of Sundance. It would have been the first time he and 'Newman, Paul' had starred together. The negotiations got down to the billing: whose name would go first? Both stars were huge and at the top of their game. A unique solution: both names appear together above the title, with the left name appearing lower, and the name on the right higher, giving them a semblance of equality. Newman said he'd take either one. McQueen suspected a trick and pulled out of the film. Ironically, this is how they were billed when they DID star together for the first time in 1974's Towering Inferno, The (1974).
  • Paul Newman and Robert Redford really leaped off the cliff; however, they landed on a ledge with a mattress roughly six feet below.
  • This movie was filmed roughly the same time as Hello! Dolly, on the soundstage next door. The director believed that the studio would allow him to film the New York scenes on "Dolly's" sets, since the two films' daily shooting schedules were totally different. After production started, though, the studio informed the director that they wanted to keep the sets for "Dolly" a secret and so refused him permission. To work around this, the director had Redford, Newman, and Ross simply pose on the sets, and took photos of them. He then inserted images of the three stars into a series of 300 actual period photos, and spliced the two different sets (real and posed) together to form the New York montage.

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