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Flame in the Wind

Flame in the Wind(1971)

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NOTES

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Cast, crew and plot information above was taken from press materials contained in copyright files and an article on the picture in the February 1972 issue of Today's Film Maker. No reviews have been found for the film, and no screenings outside Greeville, SC have been verified. The credits and summary for Flame in the Wind were taken from press materials contained in the film's copyright files. Unusual Films was the name of the cinema department at Bob Jones University in Greenville, South Carolina, an evangelical Christian college.
       According to the article in Today's Film Maker, the film studio began in 1950 as a production unit, but within a few years, expanded into a cinema division of the university. The Unusual Films studio boasted its own editing room and sound mixing facilities. The staff consisted of Katherine Stenholm, the head of the unit, Wade Ramsey, the cinematographer, George Rogier, the sound engineer and Tim Rogers, the head writer and chief film editor. Additionally, there was an art director whose duties consisted of building, painting and dressing the sets, as well as performing as the makeup artist.
       Dwight Gustafson, who composed the music for Flame in the Wind, was the dean of the School of Fine Arts. The students functioned as the film's crew, building sets, hanging the scaffolding, operating the equipment, drawing story boards and recording the sound effects. According to the article, the picture took two years to complete, with 80% of the filming done on the university's sound stage. In addition to Flame in the Wind, Unusual Films produced the 1955 film Wine of Morning and the 1963 film Red Runs the River (see below). For more information about the Spanish Inquisition, for The Naked Maja.