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Attack

Attack(1956)

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  • Attack! (1956)

    • Earl Rhue
    • 3/31/16

    This is a film that impressed me so much when I saw it as a 10 year old, that I became a life long fan of Jack Palance and Eddie Albert. The coward, portrayed by Eddie Albert, was so embedded in my heart and mind that I hated Eddie Albert in everything that I saw him in---I could not get him out of my mind. Two years later after viewing that film, did I realize that the performance of Albert was so great that he had become one of my favorite actors of all time because he made me feel that repulsive character that deeply. Until the viewing of that film, I had always seen Jack Palance in movies in the role of a villain or thug or criminal. After that film, I was forever convinced that he was the greatest hero in drama and I began to see him as all that was good in life. Lt. Costa's (Palance) bravery was due to his caring for his men. Capt. Cooney's (Albert) cowardice was due to him caring only for himself and his concerns. This conflict, as expressed in this film, became key to my developing a moral structure in my life and I forever associate caring with courage. One must have courage to care! This became one of the most important events, as well as film, in my life and I am grateful and happy that this occurred so early in my life, as to make a permanent impression of the value of life. My only regret about this film is that I never told, or wrote to Palance and Albert and told them what a great and positive impression they made on my life. That film was particularly galling on Eddie Albert---a real hero of WW2! Wow---thank you Mr. Albert--thank you Mr. Palance! You changed my Life!

  • Attack!

    • Gary W.
    • 2/22/16

    Courage, cowardice and corruption, the 3C's, are the recurrent themes in this classic war film.Captain Erskine Cooney (Eddie Albert) is commander of Fox Company due to political influence and connections from his childhood friend, Lieutenant Colonel Clyde Bartlett (Lee Marvin). Unfortunately for Fox Company, Captain Cooney is incompetent and cowardly and costs the lives of many of the men of his company.Lieutenant Joe Costa (Jack Palance) is a brave and solid soldier who confronts Captain Cooney about his cowardice.Lieutenant Harold Woodruff (William Smithers), Captain Cooney's second-in-command, also known the Executive Officer, must walk the moral tightrope of righteousness among Lieutenant Colonel Bartlett, Captain Cooney and Lieutenant Costa.This is Robert Aldrich's first in a trilogy of war films. The second film, of course, is "The Dirty Dozen" (1967) which again featured Lee Marvin and co-star Richard Jaeckel. The third film is "Too Late The Hero" (1970) which takes place in the Pacific Theater of World War 2. All of Robert Aldrich's three films are about suicide missions.

  • Attack!

    • Dashiell B.
    • 4/7/13

    A bold and compelling WWII film made during the Eisenhower era. Both Palance & Albert give raw, powerful performances, Marvin does solid work as a conniving colonel. This is a chilling account of the Battle of the Bulge, harshly targeting certain officers from the time, showing director Aldrich's main theme of men trying to prevail against impossible odds. Enthralling, brutal and gritty, this is a under-rated war film worth seeing. I give it a 4.5/5.

  • Misfortunes of War

    • Bob Hendrick
    • 11/26/10

    This underrated anti-war film (way ahead of it's time) showcases what is arguably Jack Palance and Eddie Albert's finest performances; playing hero and coward respectively.Directed by Robert Aldrich (The Dirty Dozen) this stark and unflinching glimpse into war and it's behind the scenes politics, profiles the best and the worst in all of us when faced with life and death situations.This is the World War II equivalent of "Paths of Glory" and it ranks right up there with it.It also gives of a glimpse of great things to come from Lee Marvin in a supprting role.

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