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So Big

So Big(1932)

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  • Wonderful Big film

    • Mombam
    • 4/19/14

    When you wish that a film could go on and on. Last longer. Then you know it's a very good one. I just finished watching "So Big" (1932). Would you believe that I actually recorded this film EIGHT years ago, in 2006, and am just watching it now for the first time? all the players were superb. I'd like to see this film paired in a double-feature with "The Secret of Madame Blanche" (Irene Dunne). I don't know why the critics gave this film just 2 stars. I give it 4 out of 5. A must see from the early years of 'talkies'. (TCM - PLEASE show 'Madame Blanche' again soon!)

  • home girl

    • Maria Ramos
    • 5/12/13

    Barbara stanwyck can do no wrong. perhaps because she is from Brooklyn ny. what is great about this film is you see both Betty Davis and Barbara stanwyck in the same film, dare I say in the same frame?

  • Cabbages are beautiful.

    • McDermott
    • 3/15/13

    Love this movie!

  • So Big....yet unfortunately, so small.

    • Cynthia
    • 6/9/11

    Hardie Albright was miscast as the older Dirk. There is no hunger in his eyes or passion in his spirit. Betty Davis plays an unbelievable Dallas, but she is fun to watch non-the-less if you are a fan of hers as am I. Barbara never quite gets the depth of her character and she constantly sends mixed emotional signals.But, I believe it's a good film to watch if you are a classic movie fan, even though it does sort of plod along. I like most of the movies made in the 30's, however!

  • So Big is Soooo Slow

    • Chris B.
    • 6/9/11

    This, the 1932 version of Edna Ferber's Pulitzer Prize winning novel, despite a stellar cast, is a dated, slow moving and laborious work directed by William A. Wellman. It's stars include Barbara Stanwyck, Dickie Moore, Alan Hale, Bette Davis and George Brent. A good supporting cast rounded out the players. With a cast like this and a director who knows, all too well, the medium in which his talents are best served this film misses the mark altogether. Your time would be better spent in watching the 1953 version starring Jane Wyman. She steals the show with her portrayal of Selina De Jong.

  • Please bring this back to TCM!

    • Alison
    • 9/13/10

    I've been waiting so long to see this movie come to TCM again...I love early Stanwyck and with George Brent and Bette Davis in the mix, it's such a wonderful film!

  • So Big (1932)

    • James Higgins
    • 2/19/10

    Barbara Stanwyck is such a wonderful actress, I don't think she has ever given a poor performance. This film is a little too melodramatic, but it is also moving and so nicely filmed. Good supporting cast, but it is Stanwyck that makes the film work. Directed by William Wellman, also starring George Brent, Dickie Moore, Bette Davis and Alan Hale.

  • So Big, 1932

    • Don Darnell
    • 2/10/10

    Bette Davis and Barbara Stanwyck sharing the silver screen in a film based on a Pulitizer Prize winning American novel? How "classic" can you get!Hollywood made 3 feature length adaptations of Edna Ferber's Pulitizer Prize-winning novel, So Big (1924, 1932, 1953). The two talkies alone (1932 & 1953) star the likes of Bette Davis, Barbara Stanwyck, Jane Wyman and Sterling Hayden, yet we never see these films on Turner Classic Movies! The fact that these feature films are never/rarely shown is especially aggravating to those of us who grew-up in the far south side Chicago neighborhood depicted in the book and films. Very few people today even know these films exist.Perhaps TCM could show the 1932 and 1953 films (the two with sound) on consecutive nights? Maybe during an Edna Ferber week of movies? Ferber's Giant, Show Boat and Cimarron could round out the week nicely. At the very least, please, insert the wonderful 1932 version of So Big into the TCM schedule -- the film with Stanwyck and Davis. The sooner the better.

  • 4th of 9 movies of Bette Davis' in 1932

    • p.h.oenix
    • 7/29/09

    Barbara Stanwyck, at 25yo, acts out the lead role in this drama. 24yo Bette Davis acts out a supporting role. Is this the only movie that Stanwyck and Davis were in together? If so, that's special since they became two of Hollywood's finest character actors of all time in the classics. Stanwyck is the farming mother who puts her son, "So Big" (Dirk, played by Dickie Moore) through school to become an architect. Before Stanwyck became a widow with a child to raise, she worked for a family teaching their son, Roelf (George Brent). Dirk becomes a jerk who's humiliated to be a farmer's son so he takes a job from a married lover's husband selling bonds. Then, meets Dallas O'Mara (Bette Davis), an artist who won't have much to do with him until he gets a more meaningful career. This is a very interesting movie with quite an impressive cast who really deliver.

  • Barbara Stanwyck & Bette Davis

    • Mikhhhail
    • 5/9/09

    24yo Bette Davis (1908-1989) & 25yo Barbara Stanwyck (1907-1990) are characters of different generations in this film. Stanwyck being the mother of a man who proposes marraige to Davis, who refuses. It's fabulous to watch both young actors in the same film (for the 1st & only time?). The film's plot is a very tame drama that took quite a bit of acting skill to make the story engaging. Since I feel that Stanwyck was one of the best actors who got the least notoriety & Davis was actually named the "Queen of Hollywoood," she was so well regarded both make this film work.

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