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The Gold Rush

The Gold Rush(1925)

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The Gold Rush In this silent film, a lost... MORE > $29.95 Regularly $29.95 Buy Now blu-ray

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  • Does any one believe---

    • Millie
    • 3/24/14

    Let's face it, does anyone believe that if Chaplin was a Christian conservative, that he would receive any praise from the Hollywood community? Truthfully, there would be dead silence!

  • One Of The Greatest Films Of the Twentieth Century

    • Michael O'Farrell
    • 12/7/13

    "The Gold Rush" is not only one of the finest silent films ever made but one of the greatest American films of all time. And I think it's very important to note that I'm referring to the original, uncut silent masterpiece, not the re-edited 1942 re-release with added sound narration by Chaplin. Although Chaplin insisted that the '42 version was his definitive cut of the film hindsight has proven that the 1925 original is a towering work of art that is as meaningful, funny and moving an experience today as it was to movie audiences in the silent era. The added musical score by composer/conductor Timothy Brock which accompanies the film on the Criterion release, adapted from the '42 version (the one great contribution from Chaplin when he re-tooled the film for sound) adds immeasurably to the silent film's impact, wedding Chaplin's music to his early full length masterpiece. Charles Chaplin, a genius who contributed mightily to the art of the motion picture in its early stages, on through Hollywood's Golden Age and onto the 1950s and beyond, deserves to be recognized for the contributions he made for bringing his indelible mix of comedy and drama to the screen. His work is unique ; there really was nobody else quite like him, not even the brilliant Buster Keaton, as amazing a talent as that man was.The 1942 "Gold Rush" has its admirers and that version of the film is fascinating to watch to see how Chaplin reconfigured the story by eliminating the silent film's inter-titles, re-editing and excising several scenes and altering the ending for quite a different effect. His wonderful music score was the film's true highlight and its inclusion on Criterion's release of the silent production is a major asset. What dates the 1942 version is Chaplin's clipped, high pitched narrative voice which undermines both the comic and dramatic elements of the film considerably. The silent "Gold Rush" remains immortal.

  • The Gold Rush

    • Dashiell B.
    • 4/18/13

    Chaplin's most-pitch-perfect film. The little tramp finds himself in the Klondike to search for gold and love. As per usual in his films, Chaplin reaffirms that comedy and tragedy are never too far apart from each other, creating humour from the more serious events of Klondike Gold Rush. Famous scenes include Chaplin eating his shoe and the dance with rolls which he performs to a dance-hall girl. Overall, a masterpiece of comedy. I give it a 5/5.

  • Show the real silent version

    • Neal Rauch
    • 1/5/12

    I agree that the 1942 version of the film is wanting. When AMC used to show American movie classics, they ran the 1925 edition with a piano soundtrack by William Perry c. 1970 (from the Paul Killiam collection). I have it on VHS & it's a great version. (Would love it if TCM showed other silents with Perry's scores - even if they have to marry them to prints with better restoration than Killiam's).I believe there's a newer version making the rounds, which adapted Chaplin's music to the 1925 edition - minus the yapping. I look forward to TCM airing that!

  • The Gold Rush

    • Mark Sutch
    • 4/5/11

    *****

  • Chaplin the comedienne?

    • Jackie
    • 2/7/10

    Charlie, Hollywood's favorite comedienne or favorite lefty? There is no doubt, that Chaplin had a funny streak but I would not classify him as great, he certainly was no genius. His personal life was not one that anyone could admire unless you were in the same business as Charlie, these people are without morals. It should be noted, that in Hollywood today, one must lean very, very far to the left in order to obtain any praise from your peers and that black listing is now practiced in reverse.

  • The Gold Rush (1925)

    • James Higgins
    • 12/12/09

    Unquestionably one of the greatest movies of all time, it is a classic masterpiece. Charlie Chaplin is brilliant, both his direction and his acting. Tremendously funny, touching and sweet. It's a rare filmmaker that can combine slapstick humor with heart wrenching scenes. Absolutely wonderful.

  • Genius?

    • Jack The Hat
    • 5/25/09

    I note that many consider Chaplin a genius. I am wondering why? He would close down production for months in order to obtain an idea for the film he was working on at the time. Even though he was executive producer (he owned the company) the losses must have been staggering. Had any one else caused a slow down in production, Chaplin would have fired them. Chaplin is much over rated and the only true reason to sing his praises was because of his political leannings.

  • Over Rated actor

    • Jack The Hat
    • 4/25/09

    I believe that Chaplin is much to over rated as a comedian and the "Gold Rush" is an example. This film is not funny because of Charlie but because of Mack Swain (Big Jim McKay)-- his facial expressions are the funniest that I have ever seen, bar none also credit should be given to Georgia Hale (Georgia) her acting made the gradual romance of her and Charlie seem real.Without these character actors, this picture would not have been the succcess that it was.

  • Criticism

    • Jackie
    • 4/18/09

    Recently some one wrote a cricical revue of the Gold Rush, it included criticism of "Saint Charles Of The Chaplin", in which TCM promptly removed. I don't know why, unless your not allowed to speak ill of Hollywoods number one hero. You are much to sensitive TCM.even when one speaks the truth.

  • Tom is right!!!!!!!!!!!

    • Larry
    • 4/2/09

    Wouldn't it be nice if TCM listened to its viewers for a change? Please, please show ONLY the original silent version of this once great film!!!!!!!!!!!

  • Please, show the silent version!!!

    • Jack The Hat
    • 2/25/09

    Tom is right Chaplin's voice over is annoying and destroys this great film---please, show the silent version!

  • Why?

    • Tom
    • 8/2/08

    TCM frequently shows The Gold Rush, a great movie, but best I can tell only shows the 1942 rerelease with the title cards removed and Chaplin's narration added to the soundtrack. I find this version of the film unwatchable--it's like colorization, but with sound. It makes no difference that Chaplin himself oversaw the adaption; the results still stink. The narration intrudes on the beauty of the film, informing viewers of every detail even though they can see them for themselves and, worse, instructing them on how to react to the action. PLEASE show the silent version of this movie!

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