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Bringing Up Baby

Bringing Up Baby(1938)

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Bringing Up Baby (1938)

SYNOPSIS

Dr. David Huxley (Cary Grant) is a stodgy paleontologist who is trying to get funding for his museum, marry his secretary and complete work on a fossil, all on the same day. A self-assured but eccentric heiress, Susan Vance (Katharine Hepburn) throws a wrench in his plan when she steals his golf ball during a game with a potential benefactor. Their ensuing relationship leads to a series of outrageous situations involving two escaped leopards (one a pet, the other a dangerous zoo specimen), a police lockup, a big game hunter, a society dowager, a mischievous dog and a missing dinosaur bone before romance wins the day.

Director: Howard Hawks
Producer: Howard Hawks
Screenplay: Dudley Nichols, Hagar Wilde
Based on the Story by WildeCinematography: Russell Metty
Editing: George Hively
Art Direction: Van Nest Polglase, Perry Ferguson
Music: Roy Webb
Cast: Katharine Hepburn (Susan Vance), Cary Grant (David Huxley), CharlesRuggles (Maj. Horace Applegate), May Robson (Aunt Elizabeth), BarryFitzgerald (Mr. Gogarty), Walter Catlett (Constable Slocum), Fritz Feld(Dr. Fritz Lehman), Leona Roberts (Hannah Gogarty), George Irving(Alexander Peabody), Virginia Walker (Alice Swallow), Jack Carson(Roustabout), Ward Bond (Motorcycle Cop), Skippy (George, the Dog), Nissa(Baby, the Leopard)
BW-102m.

Why BRINGING UP BABY is Essential

In the eyes of many critics, Bringing Up Baby is the quintessentialscrewball comedy, incorporating all the standard elements of the genre such as themadcap heiress, a hapless leading man virtually victimized by herattentions and a group of stuffed shirts whose pomposity is deflated by thefarcical goings on. It also stands as a prime example of the liberatinginfluence of eccentricity (and the female) in the screwballcomedy.

Critics would also link Bringing Up Baby to such recurrent Hawks trademarks asthe aggressive female who destroys a man's composure, fast-paced action anddialogue and the sparse use of close-ups. Throughout his career, Hawkspreferred to shoot his romantic leads in two-shots that emphasized a senseof partnership, even among such unlikely pairs as Susan Vance and DavidHuxley in this film. In tribute to Hawks, the French critics would referto the medium two-shot as le plan Americain.

At the time Bringing Up Baby was made, Katharine Hepburn was experiencing some trouble with RKO. The studio suits knew Hepburn had a considerable personal fortune and no tolerance for people who undermined her position so they offered her an ultimatum once Bringing Up Baby began to go over budget. She had the option to take a part in an undesirable film--Mother Carey Chickens (1938)r buy out her contract. To no one surprise, she chose the latter.

Despite the fact that Bringing Up Baby was not very well received in its day, the cast of the film was dedicated to having fun and bringing about its success. Hawks wanted to capture a side of Hepburn he'd seen once during the filming of Mary of Scotland (1936) when she was working with Hawks's friend, John Ford. Hawks modeled Huxley, Grant's character, on aspects of Harold Lloyd's and John Ford's personalities. He even gave the Grant character Harold Lloyd's trademark small, round glasses. Hawks also captured the good-natured teasing and banter between Hepburn and Ford he witnessed on the set of Mary of Scotland in the Grant-Hepburn relationship in Bringing Up Baby. The film still continues to delight audiences 60 years later, and yes, George, the troublesome terrier in the film, was also featured in the Thin Man series and The Awful Truth (1937)

Like Casablanca (1942), Bringing Up Baby is a film that became aclassic thanks to television airings starting in the '50s and revivalscreenings during the height of repertory cinema in the '60s. It is now regarded as one of the greatest comedies of Hollywood's golden age and has influenced the work of such contemporary directors as Peter Bogdanovich, Jonathan Demme and the Coen Brothers.

by Rob Nixon, Kerryn Sherrod & Jeff Stafford

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Bringing Up Baby (1938)

Director Howard Hawks was instrumental in the development of screwballcomedy, thanks to Twentieth Century (1935), his fast-paced battle of thesexes pitting stage and screen star Carole Lombard against her one-timementor, producer John Barrymore.

Hawks would continue to exploit Grant's talents for screwball comedy inHis Girl Friday (1940), with Rosalind Russell; I Was a Male WarBride (1949), with Ann Sheridan; and Monkey Business (1952),with Ginger Rogers and Marilyn Monroe. In the latter two, he would onceagain put the actor in women's clothing.

Grant and Hepburn, who had previously co-starred in SylviaScarlett, would re-team for two George Cukor films, Holiday(1938) and The Philadelphia Story (1940). The latter film was amajor hit that ended Hepburn's days as box-office poison.

Hawks would refer to his 1964 comedy, Man's Favorite Sport? starringRock Hudson and Paula Prentiss, as a re-make of Bringing Up Baby, atleast in spirit. He originally offered the film's male lead to Cary Grant,but Grant did not want to play opposite younger women any more, and Hawksrefused to cast older actresses in the female roles.

Director Peter Bogdanovich openly credited Bringing Up Baby asthe inspiration for his What's Up, Doc? (1972), a comedy about astrait-laced scientist (Ryan O'Neal) whose life is turned upside down by amadcap young woman (Barbra Streisand). Hawks had actually advisedBogdanovich to show his actors Bringing Up Baby before filming so they wouldn't overplay or exaggerate the comic tone. After the film came out, he told Bogdanovich, "You made a mistake in telling 'em where you stole it from. I didn't tell 'em whereI stole it from."

Bringing Up Baby has inspired several contemporary films aboutfree-spirited women liberating pompous young men. Jonathan Demme's 1986Something Wild features Melanie Griffith as a con artist who breaksthrough Jeff Daniels' reserve. Madonna's 1987 vehicle, Who's ThatGirl?, was clearly modeled on the film. The box-office disaster evenhad the stars involved with a runaway cougar. The 1991 television movieMimi and Me, starring Terry Farrell of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine fame and Broadway singing star Howard McGillin, was a role reversal imitation of the Hawks comedy featuring a female orthodontist with an interest in dinosaur teeth. The sitcomDharma and Greg (1997-2002), starring Jenna Elfman and ThomasGibson, also explored the concept on a weekly basis.

by Frank Miller

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Bringing Up Baby (1938)

George the dog is played by Skippy, a wire-haired terrier better knownto film fans as Asta from MGM's The Thin Man series. He also hadplayed Mr. Smith, the dog whose custody Cary Grant and Irene Dunne fightover in The Awful Truth.

Grant's explanation for wearing women's clothes in the film, "I justwent gay all of a sudden," was improvised on set, which may explain how itslipped by the Production Code Administration (PCA), Hollywood'sself-censorship group. Between 1934, when the PCA began strict Codeenforcement, and 1961, when the Code was amended, any mention ofhomosexuality was strictly forbidden on screen. This marks the only use of"gay" to mean "homosexual" in a Hollywood film of that era. Somehistorians have suggested that it's the screen's first use of "gay" in asexual context.

Another improvisation occurred when Hepburn accidentally broke a heelwhile she and Grant were hunting for Baby. As she limped around the set,she said, "I was born on the side of a hill," and Hawks left it in. Shewould later say that Grant had whispered the line in her ear.

Hawks inserted a reference to Grant's previous screwball hit, TheAwful Truth, in Bringing Up Baby when Hepburn pretends to be a gangster's moll.She says that Grant is a crook called "Jerry the Nipper," the samenickname Irene Dunne had given Grant in the earlier film when she pretendedto be his low-class sister.

Grant's circus background came in handy for the final scene, in whichthe dinosaur skeleton he's working on collapses, and he pulls Hepburn uponto his scaffold after her ladder falls over. He drilled her on exactlywhen to let go of the ladder and how to grab his wrist to make sure neitherwould be hurt.

FUN QUOTES FROM BRINGING UP BABY (1938)

"Now once and for all David, nothing must interfere with your work. Ourmarriage must entail no domestic entanglements of any kind." - VirginiaWalker as Alice Swallow.

"Your ball, your car. Is there anything in the world thatdoesn't belong to you?" - Katharine Hepburn as Susan Vance.

"The love impulse in man very frequently reveals itself in terms ofconflict." - Fritz Feld as Dr. Fritz Lehman, later quoted by KatharineHepburn as Susan Vance.

"Let's play a game...Watch, I'll put my hand over my eyes, and then you goaway...See, and I'll count to ten, and when I take my hand down you will begone!" - Cary Grant as David Huxley.

"If you had an aunt who would give you a million dollars if she liked you,and you knew she wouldn't like you if she found a leopard in her apartment,what would you do?" - Katharine Hepburn as Susan Vance.

"I just went gay all of a sudden." - Cary Grant as David Huxley.

"There is a leopard on your roof, and it's my leopard, and I have toget it, and to get it I have to sing." - Katharine Hepburn as Susan Vance."Out of seven million people, why did I have to run into you yesterday?" -Cary Grant as David Huxley.

"You mean you don't want me to help you any more -- after all the fun we'vehad?" - Katharine Hepburn as Susan Vance.

"In moments of quiet, I'm strangely drawn to you, but -- well -- therehaven't been any quiet moments." - Cary Grant as DavidHuxley.

"Hey, flatfoot! I'm gonna unbutton my puss and shoot the woiks. An' Iwouldn't be squealin' if he hadn't a give me the runaround for anothertwist." - Katharine Hepburn, as Susan Vance, posing as Swinging-doorSusie.

"Well, there's nothing else I can say except that I'm glad before ourmarriage you showed yourself up in your true colors. You're just abutterfly!" - Virginia Walker as Alice Swallow.

Compiled by Frank Miller

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Bringing Up Baby (1938)

Producer-director Howard Hawks was immersed in script and castingproblems with Gunga Din (1939) when he decided he needed a change of pacein 1937, so he started looking around for something different. He found itwhen someone in RKO's story department recommended a Collier'smagazine story by Hagar Wilde called "Bringing Up Baby." The story dealtwith a couple who lose a tame panther in the wilds of Connecticut. Hepicked up the rights for just $1,004.

After working with Wilde for a few weeks to flesh out the story, Hawksrealized he would need a more experienced screenwriter, so he called inDudley Nichols, better known for such dramatic films as TheInformer (1935), and asked him to work with her. It would be Nichols' onlyreal comedy.

The property was always planned as a vehicle for Katharine Hepburn. Infact, it would be her first pure comedy. Up to that point, Hepburn had been featuredmostly in period romances, but audiences had tired of her work in thosefilms, so the studio was trying to resuscitate her career with morecontemporary roles. At the time RKO picked up the story, she was filmingStage Door (1937), a contemporary backstage story, and reports from the setindicated that the film might turn her box-office decline around. It didn't,scoring only a small profit, but Bringing Up Baby was an attempt tomove her career further in what seemed to be the rightdirection.

Nichols modeled the character of Susan Vance on the Hepburn he had seenon the set of John Ford's Mary of Scotland, which he had written.The director and star had forged a close friendship while working on the film,with Hepburn's playfulness constantly tweaking Ford's more serious nature.Some historians even think Ford was the model for Bringing Up Baby'sleading man, David Huxley.

The male lead was turned down by Leslie Howard, Fredric March, RobertMontgomery, Ronald Colman and Ray Milland before Hawks turned to CaryGrant, who had previously worked with Hepburn in Sylvia Scarlett (1935).Grant didn't want to do the film either, claiming that he didn't understandthe character. Hawks said, "You've seen Harold Lloyd, haven't you?" andcounseled the actor to play the role in the manner of the noted silentscreen clown as a total innocent caught up in insane events. He even hadGrant wear horn-rimmed glasses like Lloyd's.

To flesh out the cast, RKO borrowed Charles Ruggles from Paramount toplay the big game hunter and Barry Fitzgerald from Mary Pickford'sproduction company to play the drunken groundskeeper. Virginia Walker, whoplayed Grant's fiancee was the first actress to be placed under personalcontract by Hawks, who loaned her to RKO. She would end up marrying hisbrother Bill.

The origin of one gag in particular was based on an actual occurrence. According to Jack Haley, Jr., who heard the story first hand from Cary Grant, "It was the scene in which Cary steps on the tail of Katharine Hepburn's dress and tears out the rear panel. He based it on a real-life happening. He went to the Roxy Theatre in New York. Sitting next to him were the head of the Metropolitan Museum and his wife. At some point he gets up to go to the men's room and returns. A little while later the woman gets up and crosses in front of him. They're right at the edge of the balcony, he starts to stand, and he sees that his fly is open. So he zips his fly shut and catches her frock in it. They had to lock step to the manager office to get pliers to unzip his fly from her dress. He told Howard Hawks the story, and Hawks used it. He couldn't use the fly joke, but he used the lockstep."

by Frank Miller

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Bringing Up Baby (1938)

According to Howard Hawks in the book, Hawks on Hawks by Joseph McBride, the director had some difficulty getting Hepburn to stop overacting during the early stages of production. "The great trouble is people trying to be funny," Hawks observed. "If they don't try to be funny, then they are funny. I couldn't do any good with her, so I went over to an actor who was a comic for the Ziegfeld Follies and everything, Walter Catlett, and said, "Walter, have you been watching Miss Hepburn?" He said, 'Yeah.' "Do you know what she's doing?" 'Yeah.' And I said, "Will you tell her?" He said, 'No.' "Well," I said, "supposing she asks you to tell her?" 'Well then, I'l have to tell her.' So I went over to Kate, and I said, 'We're not getting along too well on this thing. I'm not getting through to you, but there's a man here who I think could. Do you want to talk to him?' She came back from talking with him and said, 'Howard, hire that guy and keep him around here for several weeks, because I need him.' And from that time on, she knew how to play comedy better, which is just to read lines." Hepburn also asked Hawks to give Catlett a role in the film so she could call on him for further help. Hawks cast him as the town constable.

Hepburn also loved to talk, which caused problems for Hawks when he neededto shoot scenes. When she ignored the assistant director's repeated criesof "Quiet," Hawks just motioned the rest of the crew to stop what they weredoing until she realized she was the only one talking. She asked, "What'sthe matter?" and Hawks said, "You're acting a good part of a parrot, and ifyou're going to keep on doing it, we'll just sit here and watch you." Atthat, she took Hawks aside and told him not to talk to her like thatbecause she had a lot of friends working on the film. Hawks called to anelectrician on a scaffold overhead and said, "If you had a choice ofdropping a lamp on Miss Hepburn or me, who would you drop it on?" The mantold Hawks to get out of the way, and Hepburn just said, "I guess I'mwrong" and never misbehaved again.

From that point, the atmosphere on the set was harmonious. Hepburn servedhigh tea every day at four. On some days, Hawks cancelled shooting andtook the cast to the races. When he was particularly pleased with onescene, he brought the cast two cases of champagne.

Hepburn and Grant frequently socialized off the set, double-dating withtheir respective steadies at the time, Howard Hughes and Phyllis Brooks.They loved working on the film so much that they frequently arrived early.Since Hawks was usually late, they spent their time working out new bits ofcomic business.

Among their inventions was the bit in which Grant accidentally rips offthe back of Hepburn's dress, and the two have to walk in lockstep while hecovers her exposed derriere with his hat. Something similar had actuallyhappened to Grant when he was seated in a theatre near the manager of theMetropolitan Museum of Art and his wife. When he stood to let the womanpass, he realized his fly was open and accidentally zipped her dress intohis fly. They had to walk in the same way to the manager's office insearch of a pair of pliers with which to open the stucksipper.

Hepburn worked beautifully with the leopard, Nissa, and impressed thecat's trainer, Mme. Olga Celeste, as a natural for animal training. UnderMme. Celeste's guidance, she spent time with Nissa before each day's shoot.She wore lots of perfume because it made the cat more playful and putresin on the soles of her shoes to prevent any sudden slips that mightscare her. She had only one close call, when she turned too quickly andthe beast clawed at her flaring skirt. Only a sharp crack on the head fromMme. Celeste kept Nissa from doing further damage.

Despite Hepburn's knack for working with Nissa, the studio wasn'ttaking any chances. Some scenes involving the leopard, like the drive toConnecticut, were done as process shots, with Nissa matted into the shotafter the actors had done their work. For the scene in which Hepburn dragsBaby into the jail house, you can even see the break between the ropeHepburn is holding and the rope attached to the cat.

After a bad start, Hawks grew to respect Hepburn tremendously forher comic timing, ad-libbing skills and physical control. He would tellthe press, "She has an amazing body -- like a boxer. It's hard for her tomake a wrong turn. She's always in perfect balance. She has thatbeautiful coordination that allows you to stop and make a turn and neverfall off balance. This gives her an amazing sense of timing. I've neverseen a girl that had that odd rhythm and control."

Throughout filming, RKO executives complained that the film wasdestined for commercial failure. They asked Hawks to insert more romanceand less slapstick and told him to take away Grant's glasses, but heignored them.

The film's original budget was $767,000, but Hawks spent so much timeindulging his penchant for improvisation that it finally came in at$1,073,000 and 40 days behind schedule. RKO management was so angry theypulled him off his next project, Gunga Din. Ironically, hisreplacement on that film, George Stevens, was just as painstaking as Hawks.The only difference was that Stevens' film made money at the boxoffice.

Near the end of filming, Hepburn's name appeared in a trade ad placedby the Independent Theatre Owners Association at the top of a list ofperformers they considered "box-office poison." Also on the list were JoanCrawford, Greta Garbo and Marlene Dietrich. The publicity about Hepburn'slack of popularity did little to help Bringing Up Baby at the boxoffice.

Despite strong previews and trade reviews, the film performederratically. It did well in most West Coast and East Coast cities,faltered in the Midwest and, amazingly, flopped big time in New York City,where it was pulled from the Radio City Music Hall after just one week.Hawks would later say the problem was that he had failed to put any normalcharacters into the film so there was nobody for the audience to identifywith.

RKO was still committed to pay Hepburn for two more films at $75,000apiece. To get rid of her they assigned her to make a B-movie, Mother Carey'sChickens. Rather than make that film, Hepburn bought out hercontract for $220,000.

by Frank Miller

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teaser Bringing Up Baby (1938)

Cary Grant and Katharine Hepburn team up for the second time in Howard Hawks' 1938 screwball comedy, Bringing Up Baby (Their first film together was Sylvia Scarlett, 1935). Cary Grant plays the stodgy Dr. David Huxley, a paleontologist who is trying to get funding for his museum, marry his secretary and complete work on a fossil, all on the same day. A self-assured but eccentric heiress, Susan Vance (Katharine Hepburn) throws a wrench in his plan when she steals his golf ball during a game with a potential benefactor. In the ensuing 102 minutes, David and Susan are put through a series of outrageous situations involving leopards, a police lockup, and a missing dinosaur bone before the anticipated romantic fade-out.

Though Bringing Up Baby (1938) featured a wonderful cast and expert comic direction by Howard Hawks, it was not a box office hit. With the approaching war in Europe and the Depression not yet behind them, American filmgoers were looking to the movies for total escapism. Despite a delightfully absurb plot, the characters in Bringing Up Baby were intellectuals and the dialogue was considered too fanciful for mainstream audiences at the time.

Still, there were plenty of hilarious sight gags and situations to keep audiences laughing. The origin of one gag in particular was based on an actual occurence. According to Jack Haley, Jr., who heard the story first hand from Cary Grant, "It was the scene in which Cary steps on the tail of Katherine Hepburn's dress and tears out the rear panel. He based it on a real-life happening. He went to the Roxy Theatre in New York. Sitting next to him were the head of the Metropolitan Museum and his wife. At some point he gets up to go to the men's room and returns. A little while later the woman gets up and crosses in front of him. They're right at the edge of the balcony, he starts to stand, and he sees that his fly is open. So he zips his fly shut and catches her frock in it. They had to lock step to the manager's office to get pliers to unzip his fly from her dress. He told Howard Hawks the story, and Hawks used it. He couldn't use the fly joke, but he used the lockstep."

According to Howard Hawks in the book, Hawks on Hawks by Joseph McBride, the director had some difficulty getting Hepburn to stop overacting during the early stages of production. "The great trouble is people trying to be funny," Hawks observed. "If they don't try to be funny, then they are funny. I couldn't do any good with her, so I went over to an actor who was a comic for the Ziegfeld Follies and everything, Walter Catlett, and said, "Walter, have you been watching Miss Hepburn?" He said, "Yeah." "Do you know what she's doing?" "Yeah." And I said, "Will you tell her?" He said, "No." "Well," I said, supposing she asks you to tell her?" "Well then, I'd have to tell her." So I went over to Kate, and I said, "We're not getting along too well on this thing. I'm not getting through to you, but there's a man here who I think could. Do you want to talk to him?" She came back from talking with him and said, "Howard, hire that guy and keep him around here for several weeks, because I need him." And from that time on, she knew how to play comedy better, which is just to read lines."

At the time this film was made, Katharine Hepburn was experiencing some trouble with RKO. The studio suits knew Hepburn had a considerable personal fortune and no tolerance for people who undermined her position so they offered her an ultimatum once Bringing Up Baby began to go over budget. She had the option to take a part in an undesirable film--Mother Carey's Chickens (1938)- or buy out her contract. To no one's surprise, she chose the latter.

Despite the fact that it was not very well received in its day, the cast of Bringing Up Baby (1938) was dedicated to having fun and bringing about its success. Hawks wanted to capture a side of Hepburn he'd seen once during the filming of Mary of Scotland (1936) when she was working with Hawks' friend, John Ford. Hawks modeled Huxley, Grant's character, on aspects of Harold Lloyd's and John Ford's personalities. He even gave the Grant character John Ford's trademark small, round glasses. Hawks also captured the good-natured teasing and banter between Hepburn and Ford he witnessed on the set of Mary of Scotland in the Grant-Hepburn relationship in Bringing Up Baby. The film still continues to delight audiences 60 years later, and yes, George, the troublesome terrier in the film, was also featured in Thin Man series and The Awful Truth (1937)

Director: Howard Hawks
Producer: Howard Hawks
Screenplay: Dudley Nichols, Hagar Wilde (based on the short story by Hagar Wilde)
Cinematography: Russell Metty
Editor: George Hively
Art Direction: Van Nest Polglase, Perry Ferguson
Music: Roy Webb
Cast: Katharine Hepburn (Susan Vance), Cary Grant (Dr. David Huxley), Charlie Ruggles (Maj. Horace Applegate), May Robson (Aunt Elizabeth), Barry Fitzgerald (Mr. Gogarty), Walter Catlett (Constable Slocum)
BW-103m. Close captioning, Descriptive Video.

by Kerryn Sherrod

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Bringing Up Baby (1938)

Amazingly, in light of its current classic status, Bringing Up Babywas a box office failure, mainly because it went over budget and grossed only$715,000 in the U.S. and another $394,000 in the rapidly declining overseasmarket. It also received decidedly mixed reviews from the critics.

"In Bringing Up Baby, Miss Hepburn has a role which calls for her tobe breathless, senseless and terribly, terribly fatiguing. She succeeds,and we can be callous enough to hint it is not entirely a matter ofperformance." - Frank S. Nugent, The New York Times

"The players deserve the chief credit for the smattering of amusement inthe offering. The part of a spoiled playgirl is perfectly suited to MissHepburn's talents, and she offers as breezy a performance as the scriptpermits. Mr. Grant has more chance to create a burlesque, but he sometimesfinds himself stranded while the plot makes good and sure that no one willmiss a gag or a comical situation." - Howard Barnes New York HeraldTribune.

"Bringing Up Baby's slapstick is irrational, rough-&-tumble,undignified, obviously devised with the idea that the cinemaudience willenjoy (as it does) seeing stage Actress Hepburn get a proper mussing up." -Time.

"I am happy to report that it is funny from the word go, that it has noother meaning to recommend it...and that I wouldn't swap it for any threethings of the current season." - Otis Ferguson, The NewRepublic.

"The director, Howard Hawks, keeps all this trifling nonsense in suchartful balance that it never impinges on the real world; it may be theAmerican movies' closest equivalent to Restoration comedy." - Pauline Kael,5001 Nights at the Movies.

Film Scholar Morris Dickstein in his essay on Bringing Up Baby in the book, The A List: The National Film Society of Film Critics' 100 Essential Films, wrote, "The zany effervescence of screwball comedy, with its buoyant, anarchic energy and rapid-fire dialogue, became a suggestive way not only of countering depression but of making movies about sex without any sex in them. Perhaps the greatest, certainly the wildest of these movies was Howard Hawks's Bringing Up Baby."

In writing about Bringing Up Baby for his book, Guide for the Film Fanatic, Danny Peary wrote, "...this is the rare screwball comedy in which the woman pursues the man. That she causes him trouble is not unexpected, since she is so desperate to get his attention that she "does anything that comes into [my] head." You've got to admire her brazenness, and her willingness to make a fool of herself in order to win Grant. She isn't worried when he gets annoyed with her, she expresses a major theme in comedy: "The love impulse in man frequently reveals itself in terms of conflict."

Compiled by Rob Nixon & Jeff StaffordAWARDS & HONORS

In 1990, Bringing Up Baby was voted a place on the National FilmRegistry.

by Frank Miller

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