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Legong (Dance of the Virgins)

Legong (Dance of the Virgins)(1935)

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Crying Boy

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NOTES

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The title card on this film contains the subtitle, "A Story of the South Seas." The foreword reads: "Out in the Dutch East Indies, just south of the equator, lies Bali-isle of perpetual summer. Untouched by civilization, lives a contented race/Life a continuous feast-death holds no fear....Here we relate a romance of Balinese life, based on facts and authentic customs-enacted with an all native cast, and produced in its entirety upon the Isle of Bali." The film ends with the following written epilogue: "As the sun flooded the sea with the beauty of its parting glow, the pure soul of a maid set out upon its journey." This film was shot entirely on location on the Island of Bali with an all-native cast. The film was silent, with a musical score, and included subtitled narration and dialogue. The score was added to the film at RKO studios. The film's subtitles refer to the characters by the names of the actors, although the spellings vary. According to a modern source, this film and Henri de la Falaise's Kliou (The Tiger) were the last features shot in two-color (red and green) Technicolor. A news item in Motion Picture Daily on May 1, 1933 stated that de la Falaise would be leaving Hollywood for the Dutch East Indies on 2 May, where he expected to be for four months. Unit manager Gaston Glass and Technicolor expert William Howard Greene accompanied de la Falaise. A news item in Film Daily on August 18, 1933 announced de la Falaise's return to Hollywood from Bali. De la Falaise, a French Marquis and the husband of actress Constance Bennett, was the head of Bennett Pictures Corp., which was organized in 1931. Film Daily reported on November 30, 1935 that the film was in its tenth week in New York, setting a record for Balinese pictures. On February 6, 1936, Hollywood Reporter reported from Bombay that censors there made seven deletions from this film because they objected to the exposure of the bodies of women, many of whom appear bare-breasted in the film. According to a modern source, a thirty-minute print of this film was in circulation in Great Britain until the late 1940s and was primarily used to titillate audiences.