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Mom and Dad

Mom and Dad(1945)

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Remind Me

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The film opens with an offscreen choir singing "The Star Spangled Banner" while the song's words are flashed onscreen over a background of patriotic images. This is followed by a lengthy written foreword from the producers, stating that ignorance is a sin and knowledge is power, and asserting that youth is entitled to a knowledge of hygiene and complete understanding of the facts of life. An intermission follows just after "Joan" learns that "Jack" has been killed in a plane crash. During that interlude, hygiene commentator Elliott Forbes gives an offscreen presentation. In a modern interview, Kroger Babb, a partner in Hygienic Productions and one of the producers of the film, stated that he raised $62,000 from twenty investors to finance the picture. The film continued to be distributed through the 1950s and grossed between $40,000,000 and $100,000,000 internationally, according to Babb. The picture's success was in large part due to Babb's exploitation strategies. According to ads for the film, screenings were segregated by sex. The ads assured that two nurses would be in attendance at each screening, because "you May faint, but you'll learn the facts!" Each screening contained an intermission during which a lecturer using the name Elliott Forbes, "the fearless hygiene commentator," would speak and then sell sex education pamphlets addressed to "mothers and daughters" or "fathers and sons." A January 1948 ad in the Los Angeles Sentinel notes that Olympic athlete Jesse Owens introduced the film at a black theater in Los Angeles. The The Exhibitor review adds that the film ran ninety-six minutes while the lecture ran twenty-four minutes. According to Babb, as many as three hundred prints of the film were screened around the country at once, each with its own two nurses and lecturer named "Elliott Forbes." Babb also said that the film was taken to court by many local censorship boards over the course of its distribution.