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Swing Fever

Swing Fever(1944)

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NOTES

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The working titles of this film were Right About Face and Thinkin' of You. "Thinking of you" was star Kay Kyser's radio sign-off phrase. Although Cedric Gibbons and Stephen Goossn are credited as art directors in the onscreen credits, Merrill Pye is listed as art director with Goossn in Hollywood Reporter production charts. As a rule, Pye worked only on musical numbers. Although Marilyn Maxwell's onscreen credits reads "Introducing Marilyn Maxwell," Swing Fever was not her debut film. Hollywood Reporter news items add the following information about the production: Busby Berkeley was first hired as the film's director, but was dropped in early October 1942 because of scheduling conflicts with M-G-M's 1943 musical Girl Crazy .
       In mid-October 1942, however, M-G-M announced that Berkeley would co-direct the film with Kay Kyser. Marsha Hunt was to co-star with Kyser, and Nan Wynn was to play a "fat part." Neither actress appeared in the final film, however. Gus Schilling, who was known for his "Nick the Greek" character, was under consideration for a part in the film, but was not cast. Lou Nova, a former heavyweight contender, made his screen debut in the picture. According to M-G-M publicity material, Billy Coe, a real-life boxing timekeeper, was to appear as himself during the fight sequence, along with radio announcer Tom Hanlon and referee Abe Roth. Although Hanlon and Roth are credited in CBCS, Coe is not, and his appearance in the completed film has not been confirmed. Arthur Freeman and Andrew Tombes are listed as cast members in Hollywood Reporter news items, but their appearance in the final film has not been confirmed. According to a February 1944 Hollywood Reporter news item, Esther F. Olson sued Loew's, Inc. for $50,000, claiming that the studio stole the title Swing Fever from her 1940 play. The disposition of the lawsuit is not known.